West Indian Hurricanes and the March Blizzard, 1888

Front Cover
Forest and stream Publishing Company, 1889 - Blizzards - 30 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - I'll example you with thievery: The sun's a thief, and with his great attraction Robs the vast sea; the moon's an arrant thief, And her pale fire she snatches from the sun...
Page 11 - Hold fast ! that was an ugly sea ; we must lower the yards, I believe, Archer ; the ship is much pressed." " If we attempt it, Sir, we shall lose them, for a man aloft can do nothing ; besides their being down would ease the ship very little ; the mainmast is a sprung mast ; I wish it was overboard without carrying any thing else along with it ; but that can soon be done, the gale cannot last for ever ; 'twill soon be daylight now.
Page 9 - ... people not used to it ; it seemed as if the whole ship's side was going at each roll. Wooden, our carpenter, was all this time smoking his pipe and laughing at the doctor ; the second lieutenant upon deck, and the third in his hammock.
Page 9 - At eight o'clock a hurricane ; the sea roaring, but the wind still steady to a point ; did not ship a spoonful of water. However, got the hatchways all secured, expecting what would be the consequence, should the wind shift ; placed the carpenters by the mainmast, with broad axes, knowing, from experience, that at the moment you may want to cut it away to save the ship, an axe may not be found. Went to supper : bread, cheese, and porter. The...
Page 10 - This was a great condescension from such a man as Sir Hyde. However, by sending about two hundred people into the...
Page 11 - Hold fast ! that was an ugly sea. We must lower the yards, I believe, Archer; the ship is much pressed." "If we attempt it, sir, we shall lose them, for a man aloft can do nothing. Besides, their being down would ease the ship very little; the mainmast is a sprung mast; I wish it was overboard without carrying anything else along with it ; but that can soon be done : the gale cannot last forever; 'twill soon be daylight now.
Page 11 - Lost five men cutting away the fore-mast, by the breaking of a sea on board just as the mast went. That was nothing ; every one expected it would be his own fate next ; looked for daybreak with the greatest impatience. At last it came ; but what a scene did it...
Page 9 - It does indeed, Sir."—* I don't know that I ever remember its blowing so hard before, but the ship makes a very good weather of it upon this tack as she bows the sea; but we must wear her, as the wind has shifted to the...
Page 10 - At two o'clock the chain-pump was choked ; set the carpenters at work to clear it ; the two head-pumps at work upon deck : the ship gained upon us while our chain-pumps were idle : in a quarter of an hour they were at work again, and we began to gain upon her. While I was standing at the pumps, cheering the people, the carpenter's mate came running to me with a face as long as my arm. ' Oh, Sir, the ship has sprung a leak in the gunner's room.
Page 10 - In a short time he returned : " Sir, there's nothing there, tis only the water washing up between the timbers, that this booby has taken for a leak." " O, very well ; go upon deck and see if you can keep any of the water from washing down below." " Sir, I have had four people constantly keeping the hatchways secure, but there is such a weight of water upon the deck that nobody can stand it when the ship rolls-" The gunner soon afterwards came to me :

Bibliographic information