Western Animal Heroes: An Anthology of Stories by Ernest Thompson Seton

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Sunstone Press, 2005 - Fiction - 308 pages
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Naturalist Ernest Thompson Seton created a new literary form when he began writing stories about his adventures with wild animals in the 1890s. His first stories were compiled in the book, "Wild Animals I Have Known," that became popular throughout the United States and Canada. The stories are spellbinding chronicles of wild animal courage, intelligence, and endurance as they valiantly attempt to escape the traps, poisons, guns, and lariats of their human pursuers. Seton was renowned for his scientific studies of American wildlife. His stories about wild animals, however, were a mix of fact and fiction that heightened the drama of each animal's life or death struggle. During the 1890s Seton traveled to the American West and from his experiences wrote the thrilling tales contained in this collection. The exploits of Lobo (wolf), The Pacing Mustang, Tito (coyote), Monarch (grizzly), Coaly-Bay (horse), Johnny Bear, and Badlands Billy (wolf) are presented in their entirety along with many of Seton's drawings. Stephen Zimmer was Director of the Seton Memorial Library at Philmont Scout Ranch at Cimarron, New Mexico for twenty years. For this collection he contributed a biographical introduction of Ernest Thompson Seton and the historical background for each story.
 

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Contents

II
13
III
15
IV
39
V
71
VI
167
VII
207
VIII
287
IX
303
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Page 37 - ... moved a muscle when I touched him. When the sun went down he was still gazing fixedly across the prairie. I expected he would call up his band when night came, and prepared for them, but he had called once in his extremity, and none had come; he would never call again. A lion shorn of his strength, an eagle robbed of his freedom, or a dove bereft of his mate, all die, it is said, of a broken heart; and who will aver that this grim bandit could bear the threefold brunt, heartwhole? This only I...
Page 36 - And he gazed till the pony descended the pathway into the canon, and the rocks cut off the view. By travelling slowly we reached the ranch in safety, and after securing him with a collar and a strong chain, we staked him out in the pasture and removed the cords. Then for the first time I could examine him closely, and proved how unreliable is vulgar report when a living hero or tyrant is concerned. He had not a collar of gold about his neck, nor was there on his shoulders an inverted cross to denote...
Page 26 - Their flocks huddled around the goats, which, being neither fools nor cowards, stood their ground and were bravely defiant ; but, alas for them, no common wolf was heading this attack. Old Lobo, the...
Page 32 - Then followed the inevitable tragedy, the idea of which I shrank from afterward more than at the time. We each threw a lasso over the neck of the doomed wolf, and strained our horses in opposite directions until the blood burst from her mouth, her eyes glazed, her limbs stiffened and then fell limp. Homeward then we rode, carrying the dead wolf, and exulting over this, the first death-blow we had been able to inflict on the Currumpaw pack. At intervals during the tragedy, and afterward as we rode...
Page 36 - And from that time he took no more notice of us. We tied his feet securely, but he never groaned, nor growled, nor turned his head. Then with our united strength were just able to put him on my horse. His breath came evenly as though sleeping, and his eyes were bright and clear again, but did not rest on us. Afar on the great rolling mesas they were fixed, his passing kingdom, where his famous band was now scattered. And he gazed till the pony descended the pathway into the canon, and the rocks cut...

About the author (2005)

Stephen Zimmer was Director of the Seton Memorial Library at Philmont Scout Ranch at Cimarron, New Mexico for twenty years. For this collection he contributed a biographical introduction of Ernest Thompson Seton and the historical background for each story.

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