Western Civilization: The Continuing Experiment Brief Edition Since 1560

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Houghton Mifflin, Dec 1, 1998 - History - 404 pages
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The Brief Edition of Western Civilization presents a strong chronological and political framework and seamlessly integrates the social and cultural forces that have shaped the western past. Two related themes are pursued throughout: 1) Europe in relation to the rest of the world and non-Western influences, and 2) power in all its senses, public and private; economic, social, cultural, and political; symbolic and real.

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Contents

Maps
xiv
Europe in the Age of Religious War 15551648
331
2
338
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

After receiving his Ph.D. from Michigan State University, Thomas Noble taught at Albion College, Michigan State University, Texas Tech University, and the University of Virginia. In 1999 he received the University of Virginia's highest award for teaching excellence. In 2001 he became Robert M. Conway Director of the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of The Republic of St. Peter: The Birth of the Papal State, 680-825; Religion, Culture and Society in the Early Middle Ages; Soldiers of Christ: Saints and Saints' Lives from Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages; Images and the Carolingians: Tradition, Order, and Worship; and From Roman Provinces to Medieval Kingdoms. Noble's articles and reviews have appeared in many leading journals, including the American Historical Review, Byzantinische Zeitschrift, Catholic Historical Review, Revue d'histoire ecclesiastique, Speculum, and Studi medievali. He has also contributed chapters to several books and articles to three encyclopedias. He was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in 1994 and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in 1999-2000. He has been awarded fellowships by the National Endowment for the Humanities (twice) and the American Philosophical Society. He was elected a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America in 2004.

Duane J. Osheim is Professor of History at the University of Virginia.

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