Westminster Hospital Reports, Volume 5

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Page 85 - The numerous, useful, and as a body respectable men who supply the community with drinks, food, and entertainment in inns, are shown to suffer more from fatal diseases than the members of almost any other known class. They might themselves institute a strict enquiry into its causes.
Page 85 - Solicitors experience the full average mortality after the age of 35 ; the legal work is hard. ' ' Physicians and surgeons, from youth up to the age of 45, experience a mortality much above the average ; after that age they do not approach the priesthood in health, but differ little from the average. Many young practitioners have hard struggles to encounter. They are in contact with the sick, are exposed to zymotic disease, and their rest is disturbed. In states of depression, deadly poisons are...
Page 85 - But there can be little doubt that the deaths will be found to be due to delirium tremens and the many diseases induced or aggravated by excessive drinking. It seems to be well established that drinking small doses of alcoholic liquors, not only spirits, the most fatal of all the poisons, but wine and beer at frequent intervals, without food, is invariably prejudicial. When this is carried on from morning till late hours in the night, few stomachs — few brains — can stand it. The habit of indulgence...
Page 85 - Other trades indulge in the publican's practice to some extent, and to that extent share the same fate. The dangerous trades are made doubly dangerous by excesses. '• The clergy of the Established Church, Protestant ministers. Catholic priests, and barristers, all experience low rates of mortality from ages 25 to 45. The clergy lead a comfortable, temperate, domestic, moral life, in healthy parsonages, and their lives are good in the insurance sense. The young curate, compared with the young doctor,...
Page 46 - This is charged with pieces of crude licorice juice, from the size of a hazel nut to that of a walnut, which are weighted down with wellwashed pebbles.
Page 85 - The clergy lead a comfortable, temperate, domestic, moral life, in healthy parsonages, and their lives are good in the insurance sense. The young curate, compared with the young doctor, has less cares. " The mortality of Catholic priests after the age of 55 is high ; perhaps the effects of celibacy are then felt. "Solicitors experience the full average mortality after the age of 35; the legal work is hard. ' ' Physicians and surgeons, from youth up to the age of 45, experience a mortality much above...
Page 85 - Independently of the influence of the material and of the work itself on health, the place in which men work exercises so great an influence that it has to be taken into account in judging of the salubrity of their occupations. Man is naturally an open air animal ; he is made to work, and the sky is his native covering. So after taking everything into account, the hunter, the sportsman, and the husbandman in a cultivated land are at present the healthiest of all workmen. All would no doubt be the...
Page 4 - Bland. Epileptic and other Convulsive Affections of the Nervous System : their Pathology and Treatment.
Page 86 - Man is naturally an open air animal ; he is made to work, and the sky is his native covering. So, after taking everything into account, the hunter, the sportsman, and the husbandman in a cultivated land are at present the healthiest of all workmen. All would no doubt be the better if the higher parts of the brain had their due share of activity ; and this, though not often the case now, we may hope will come. " The fanners and agricultural laborers are at present among the healthiest classes of the...
Page 106 - In view of the fact that 4 of the number have died (1 among those first seen in 1880), and that the general appearance of the majority of those who have been under observation for more than one year is gradually deteriorating, I am led to believe that albuminuria should be regarded as of grave significance. In some cases, however, it may be of slight importance, and further research may enable us to discriminate between them.

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