Westward Ho!: Or, The Voyagews and Adventure of Sir Amyas Leigh, Knight, of Burrough, in the Country of Devon, in the Reign of Her Most Glorious Majesty Queen Elizabeth : Rendered Into Modern English

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Macmillan, 1889 - Great Britain - 591 pages
Charles Kingsley's Westward Ho! is the novel after which the English seaside village was named. The story follows the adventures of Amyas Leigh, an obstinate young man who decides to go sailing. He settles for a certain period in the Caribbean islands searching for gold and succeeds in making a little fortune. He then decides to go back to England by the time of the Spanish Armada, a sixteenth-century Spanish fleet that intended to invade England and overthrow Queen Elizabeth I for rivalry over colonies in the Netherlands, the Atlantic and the Pacific. Much of the novel describes the struggles between the two world powers, picturing the continuous naval battles that they engaged in. Amayas becomes greatly concerned when the Spaniards abduct his brother Frank Leigh as well as an admired local beauty named Rose Salterne. Furthermore, Amyas's life turns into a sad tragedy when he is further struck by a thunderbolt that costs him his eyesight. Generally, Kingsley gives the story a religious touch by making the war between England and Spain equally appear like a war between Protestantism and Catholicism, particularly when he shows how English hostages are often burnt at the stake by the Catholic Inquisition.
 

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Page 32 - And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Page 132 - The Sun's rim dips; the stars rush out: At one stride comes the dark; With far-heard whisper, o'er the sea, Off shot the spectre-bark.
Page 164 - All amidst the gardens fair Of Hesperus, and his daughters three That sing about the golden tree. Along the crisped shades and bowers Revels the spruce and jocund Spring; The Graces and the rosy-bosomed Hours Thither all their bounties bring.
Page 109 - The spirits of your fathers Shall start from every wave! For the deck it was their field of fame, And ocean was their grave...
Page 233 - Elijah mocked them, and said: Cry aloud, for he is a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is on a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth and must be awaked.
Page 231 - Her home is on the deep. With thunders from her native oak She quells the floods below, As they roar on the shore, When the stormy winds do blow...
Page 173 - All things are taken from us, and become Portions and parcels of the dreadful past. Let us alone. What pleasure can we have To war with evil? Is there any peace In ever climbing up the climbing wave? All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave In silence — ripen, fall, and cease: Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease.
Page 139 - Who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions. Quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens.
Page 109 - Shalt thou reign, because thou closest thyself in cedar? Did not thy father eat and drink, and do judgment and justice, and then it was well with him ? He judged the cause of the poor and needy; then it was well with him : was not this to know me ? saith the LORD.
Page 166 - Death closes all: but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.

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