What is Cognitive Science?

Front Cover
MIT Press, 1995 - Psychology - 466 pages
0 Reviews
In this richly detailed analysis, Barbara Von Eckardt lays the foundations for understanding what it means to be a cognitive scientist. She characterizes the basic assumptions that define the cognitive science approach and systematically sorts out a host of recent and the controversies surrounding them.

Von Eckardt takes issue with those who argue that there is no agreed-upon research paradigm and agreed-upon set of assumptions or methods in cognitive science, and with those who believe that the field should not be so committed. She argues that there is indeed a framework of shared commitments that includes basic questions guiding research, substantive assumptions constraining how those questions are to be answered, and methodological assumptions about how to find those answers.

A Bradford Book
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Some Preliminaries
13
The Domain and the Basic Questions
57
The Computational Assumption
97
Representation in General
143
Mental Representation
161
Current Approaches to Content Determination
197
Constraints on a Theory of Content Determination
233
Significance
281
The Methodological Assumptions
303
Epilogue Some Challenges for the Future
341
Laudans Notion of a Research Tradition
367
Notes
397
Glossary
425
References
445
Supplementary Readings
459
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Philosophy of Mind
Jaegwon Kim
No preview available - 2006
All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information