What Maisie Knew

Front Cover
The Floating Press, Feb 1, 2010 - Fiction - 468 pages
11 Reviews
Maisie's parents go through an acrimonious divorce when she is very young, and the court decrees that she will travel between them, spending time with each. They do not hesitate to use her in their war against each other, and she is neglected and abandoned by them as they each remarry and then take further lovers. The story follows her to maturity, when she is able to decide her own fate.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jmoncton - LibraryThing

Divorces are painful, especially when there are children involved. But divorces become extremely ugly when parents use the child as a weapon to hurt their former spouse. Maisie is a young girl when ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - missizicks - LibraryThing

I've only read a couple of books by Henry James, but I've enjoyed them. What Maisie Knew was a chore. The premise is horrible - a child used by her divorced parents in a horrible game of revenge ... Read full review

Contents

What Maisie Knew
5
I
12
II
18
III
24
IV
29
V
36
VI
43
VII
53
XVII
204
XVIII
218
XIX
233
XX
253
XXI
276
XXII
293
XXIII
304
XXIV
318

VIII
65
IX
83
X
96
XI
108
XII
123
XIII
139
XIV
155
XV
172
XVI
187
XXV
334
XXVI
350
XXVII
366
XXVIII
378
XXIX
392
XXX
413
XXXI
436
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About the author (2010)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

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