What Should Constitutions Do?

Front Cover
Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred D. Miller, Jr, Jeffrey Paul
Cambridge University Press, Jan 31, 2011 - Philosophy
0 Reviews
The essays in this volume - written by prominent philosophers, political scientists and legal scholars - address the basic purposes of constitutions and their status as fundamental law. Some deal with specific constitutional provisions: they ask, for example, which branches of government should have the authority to conduct foreign policy, or how the judiciary should be organized, or what role a preamble should play in a nation's founding document. Other essays explore questions of constitutional design: they consider the advantages of a federal system of government, or the challenges of designing a constitution for a pluralistic society - or they ask what form of constitution best promotes personal liberty and economic prosperity.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

LARRY ALEXANDER What Are Constitutions and What Should
1
LOREN E LOMASKY Contract Covenant Constitution
50
MICHAEL ZUCKERT
72
FERNANDO R TESÓN The Liberal Constitution and Foreign Affairs
115
SANFORD LEVINSON Do Constitutions Have a Point? Reflections
150
GERBER The Origins of an Independent Judiciary
179
ILYA SOMIN Foot Voting Political Ignorance
202
WILLIAM A GALSTON Pluralist Constitutionalism
228
JAMES S FISHKIN Deliberative Democracy and Constitutions
242
GUIDO PINCIONE The Constitution of Nondomination
261
RICHARD A EPSTEIN Can We Design an Optimal Constitution?
290
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information