What is Thought?, Or, The Problem of Philosophy by Way of a General Conclusion So Far

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T. & T. Clark, 1900 - Philosophy - 423 pages
 

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Page 95 - with God, and the Word was God. All things were made by him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men."
Page 186 - is equal to the half of thirty expresses a relation between these numbers. Propositions of this kind are discoverable by the mere operation of thought, without dependence on what is anywhere existent in the universe. Though there never were a true circle or triangle in nature, the truths demonstrated by Euclid would for ever retain their certainty and evidence.
Page 187 - curiosity to inquire what is the nature of that evidence which assures us of any real existence and matter of fact beyond the present testimony of our senses or the records of our memory. . . . All reasonings concerning matter of fact seem to be founded in the relation of Cause and
Page 19 - The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God.' It is not said, ' The fool hath thought in his heart.' So as he rather saith it by rote to himself, than that he can thoroughly believe it,
Page 172 - Were any object presented to us, and were we required to pronounce concerning the effect which will result from it, without consulting past observation ; after what manner, I beseech you, must the mind proceed in this operation ? It must invent or imagine some event which it ascribes to the object as its effect ; and it is plain that this invention must
Page 187 - intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction than the affirmative that it will rise. We should in vain, therefore, attempt to demonstrate its falsehood. Were it demonstratively false, It would imply a contradiction, and
Page 187 - never be distinctly conceived by the mind. It may, therefore, be a subject worthy curiosity to inquire what is the nature of that evidence which assures us of any real existence and matter of fact beyond the present testimony of our senses or the records of our memory.
Page 173 - entirely arbitrary. The mind can never possibly find the effect in the supposed cause by the most accurate scrutiny and examination. For the effect is totally different from the cause, and consequently can
Page 186 - and Matters of Fact. Of the first kind are the sciences of Geometry, Algebra, and Arithmetic ; and, in short, every affirmation which is either intuitively or demonstratively certain. That
Page 186 - second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner ; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible ; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with equal facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality. That the sun will

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