What Next in Europe?

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Harcourt, Brace, 1922 - Europe - 306 pages
 

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Page 292 - If we insist upon it selfishly, we shall realize in hatreds but not in cash. If we are generous, and wisely generous, those claims can all be paid, and I believe will all be paid, and the good we do with them will mean more to us materially than anything we would conceivably be parting with. "For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for My sake and the Gospel's, the same shall save it.
Page 60 - Treaties is expressed with fine moral indignation by Mr. Vanderlip, who says: "The distress that Europe is suffering . . . arises less from the direct injury of the war, than from the indirect consequences of the peace. . . . One does not need to be pro-anything to see that these treaties were conceived in hatred and malice.
Page 59 - Of all the visitations of evil upon human society as now organized, those that follow in the train of unlimited inflation of the currency have the most profound effect. It brings on the people of a nation through every level of society an endless chain of misery and suffering.
Page 274 - I would like to see every dollar that can ever be paid to us by our debtors for years to come devoted to the rehabilitation of European civilization. It is only through the rehabilitation of European civilization that these debts can ever conceivably be paid. It is only through the rehabilitation of European civilization that America can ever conceivably realize in full measure her destiny or can expect a full measure of prosperity for her people.3 ******* The indirect returns (of the expenditure)...
Page 242 - ... furnishing, free of all expense, by the Government of an adequate building, equipped for the purposes of the business ; this building and the ground upon which it stands to be given the same ex-territorial rights as those enjoyed by a foreign embassy. Third — An assurance that there will in the future be no legislation enacted to hamper the free circulation of the notes of the Gold Reserve Bank of the United States of Europe. There must be further assurance of no legislation against the free...
Page 275 - Curiously, as governments are organized in- this world and time, they find it impossible to make expenditures for those < very objects which would be of the greatest possible value in improving civilization. Moved as we are, governed as we are, it is possible for nations to raise by taxation huge sums, provided those sums are devoted to certain purposes. Without much grumbling a nation will tax itself to build at frequent intervals a $40,000,000 battleship. It will tax itself to support a great army,...
Page 308 - THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE ALL BOOKS MAY BE RECALLED AFTER 7 DAYS Renewals and Recharges may be made 4 days prior to the due date.
Page 241 - First — An official invitation by the Government of the country concerned to establish such a bank. Second — The furnishing, free of all expense, by the Government of an adequate building, equipped for the purposes of the business ; this building and the ground upon which it stands to be given the same ex-territorial rights as those enjoyed by a foreign embassy. Third — An assurance that there will in the future be no legislation enacted to hamper the free circulation of the notes of the Gold...
Page 101 - ... credits upon which she could realize. She was also in a position to command fresh credits from a world that was rich enough to grant them. From these two sources her obligation was paid and the slate was cleaned. The situation that Germany faces is utterly different. She must pay, not a lump sum, but a continuing obligation that, if carried out, will lay a heavy hand upon the lives of her youngest children.

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