What's Toxic, What's Not

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Penguin, Dec 5, 2006 - Health & Fitness - 384 pages
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Arsenic. Mercury. Pesticides. Dioxin. Toxic gases. Your typical hazardous waste dump, right? Wrong. These materials can be found in the home. Every day, people work, live, and play amid potentially harmful toxins-things they might not even know are there. They are exposed to these toxic substances in their homes, neighborhoods, schools, workplaces, foods, and consumer products.

Now, two toxics experts with decades of experience in public health have created a book that separates the risks from the myths of everyday toxins. Comprehensive and easy-to-use, this guide provides scenarios and real-life examples-including important warning signs-that show how to identify problems and what to do about them. With Q&A segments, charts to help assess risk, and a special homebuyer's guide, What's Toxic, What's Not is a book no home should be without.

 

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What's toxic, what's not

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Ginsberg and Toal-toxicologists for the Connecticut Department of Public Health-have created a comprehensive bible of hazardous substances that impact every individual in the United States. While ... Read full review

Contents

Where Do Toxic Chemicals Come From?
Risk Assessment?
Risk Comparisons
Calculating Your Risk Index
Testing Your Childs Blood Lead Level
Other Sources of Lead in the Home
Testing Your Home For Radon
Lowering Your Homes Radon Level
Steering Clear of Ozone
Air Pollution Alerts and the AQI
Reducing Your Exposure to Particulate Matter
The Ultimate Source of Particulate Matter Pollution
Federal and State Programs to Address Particulate Pollution
Reducing Your Exposure to HAPs
NIMBY Industries
Lead in Outdoor Paint

Fact or Fiction?
Testing for Mold
Fixing Your Mold Problem
Everyday Asbestos Exposures
Boomerang Toxics
Intentional Additives to Our Diet
Containers and Cookware in Our Diet
Food Contaminant Summary
Public Water System Pollutants
Small Public Water Systems
Safety Tips for Those on a Public Supply
Private Well Pollutants
Safety Tips for People on Private Wells
Cleansers and Disinfectants
Paints Varnishes and Waxes
Adhesives
Household Pesticides
Cosmetics and Personal Care Products
Volatile Organic Compounds
Combustion Products
Other Indoor Air Pollutants
Workplaces That Use Toxic Chemicals
Office Buildings
School Indoor Air Quality
Preventing Lead Exposure from Soil Contamination
Protecting Your Family from Arsenic in PressureTreated Wood
Persistent Pesticides
Buried Heating Oil Tanks
THE RISK INDEX FOR EMF
THE RISK INDEX FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES
How to Investigate Whether There Is Pollution from Below
Should My Neighborhood Be Studied?
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 13
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Dr. Gary Ginsberg is the senior toxicologist at the Connecticut Department of Public Health, and holds faculty appointments at the medical schools at Yale University and the University of Connecticut. He is a member of a National Academy of Science panel on biomonitoring. 

Brian Toal supervises the Environmental and Occupational Health Assessment Program in the Connecticut Department of Public Health, where he works closely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in preventing community exposures to toxics.

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