What's wrong with Wall Street: short-term gain and the absentee shareholder

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Addison-Wesley, 1988 - Business & Economics - 268 pages
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Lowenstein accuses large shareholders--with pension and mutual funds--of abdicating their true ownership responsibilities, joining the ranks of traders and speculators. He suggests they reclaim their proper role.

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What's wrong with Wall Street: short-term gain and the absentee shareholder

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Present-day financial markets, observes Columbia professor Lowenstein, have evolved into a speculative, short-term trading environment contrary to investors' best interests. The message is not new ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
vii
Investment Versus Speculation 13
xxv
Never Forget Rule No 1 31
xliii
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Louis Lowenstein is the Simon Rifkind Professor Emeritus of Finance and Law, Columbia Law School. Long known as a corporate critic, he was a member of the SEC's Panel on Audit Effectiveness. Lowenstein has written on financial markets widely, in Fortune, the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Barron's, and the Harvard Business Review.

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