What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World

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Crown Publishing Group, Dec 18, 2007 - Business & Economics - 288 pages
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A decade ago, computer scientist Douglas Hofstadter coined the term innumeracy, which aptly described the widespread ailment of poor quantitative thinking in American society. So, in What the Numbers Say, Derrick Niederman and David Boyum present clear and comprehensible methods to help us process and calculate our way through the world of “data smog” that we live in. Avoiding abstruse formulations and equations, Niederman and Boyum anchor their presentations in the real world by covering a particular quantitative idea in relation to a context–like probability in the stock market or interest-rate percentages. And while this information is useful toward helping us to be more financially adept, What the Numbers Say is not merely about money. We learn why there were such dramatic polling swings in the 2000 U.S. presidential election and why the system of scoring for women’s figure skating was so controversial in the 2002 Winter Olympics, showing us that good quantitative thinking skills are not only practical but fun.
 

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User Review  - setnahkt - LibraryThing

In the tradition of Innumeracy and the various Freakonomics books. The authors are a PhD mathematician (Niederman) and a PhD in Public Policy {Boyum). The book is interesting to browse, but we’ve ... Read full review

What the numbers say: a field guide to mastering our numerical world

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The bad news is that, in an age of science, complex financial planning, and competing deficit forecasts to support competing stimulus packages, the average citizen needs math more than ever. The good ... Read full review

Contents

Playing
79
A Peace Offering
229
Notes
257
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About the author (2007)

DERRICK NIEDERMAN received a B.A. in mathematics from Yale and a Ph.D. in mathematics from MIT. He is the author of This Is Not Your Father’s Stockpicking Book, The Inner Game of Investing, and A Killing on Wall Street. DAVID BOYUM received a B.A. in applied mathematics and a Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard. He has been a visiting scholar at the Yale School of Management and a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Yale.

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