What the World Should Know about Black History in the USA

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eBookit.com, Jan 13, 2013 - History - 46 pages
Walter G. (Buzz) Luttrell. WXYZ-TV Detroit, community affairs director, talk show host, & award-winning reporter. WBZ-TV Boston, two-time Emmy-winning talk-show host. At WXYZ-TV created "The Best of the Class," saluted inner-city H.S. valedictorians in 90+ U.S. cities. Received U.S. Justice Department's "Community Service Award" for nationally-distributed educational video, "The Possible Dream - Racial Harmony in U.S. Schools."
He wrote "Black America's Echoes of the Past,"his first and only print "publication" in 1969 - a 20-page "booklet," as a Black history "educational supplement" for U.S. public school history courses... after the infamous "race riots" of the '60's. (Educators cited a lack of Black history teaching resources.) Now, he has updated and modified the "booklet" as a stimulating, easy-to-read, but "challenging primer" for those interested in the history of Blacks in the USA. ("What the WORLD Should Know About Black History In The USA" - Only 22 pages, with generous illustrations.)

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About the author (2013)

Young "Buzz" remembers his parents being passionately behind 1952 Democratic presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson, then being surprised when his father came home from work four years later with an "I Like Ike" button! Then twelve, he said "I thought we were Democrats?" Whereupon his parents sat their four children down and explained that "...we listen to, read about, and discuss ALL candidates... then vote for the "best person!" (Now... wouldn't that be nice?") Luttrell was born (1944) and raised in small-town Allegan, Michigan. He graduated from Olivet College (MI) in 1967, then worked in banking, public relations, television, corporate communications, and as a "free-lance" presentation talent and coach for corporate clients. But creating, writing, and producing socially-relevant content has been at the core of virtually everything he has done since leaving banking. At WXYZ-TV Detroit he was community affairs director, talk show host, and an award-winning reporter. At WBZ-TV Boston he was a two-time Emmy-winning talk-show host. Always determined to convince his employers to support "public service" projects, as Communications Director for New Detroit, Inc., Luttrell initiated the "image campaign" that helped Detroit shake the label "Murder Capital of the World" and gain media coverage as "The Renaissance City in the mid-70's;" for WXYZ-TV he created a television campaign, "The Best of the Class," that eventually saluted inner-city high school valedictorians in over 90 U.S. cities; while with Convergent Media Systems, he received the U.S. Justice Department's "Community Service Award" for the nationally-distributed educational video, "The Possible Dream - Racial Harmony in U.S. Schools." Though never thinking of himself as an "author," Luttrell wrote his first and only work for "publication" in 1969 – a 22-page "booklet," as an educational supplement for U.S. public school "History" courses - "Black America's Echoes of the Past." That was in response to teacher complaints about a lack of written material on the role of Blacks in America, as pressure mounted to include the role of Blacks in U.S. history... after the infamous "race riots" that swept the country in the '60's. Over forty years later (2012), he was very disturbed to hear from a variety of young Black students that, aside from "Black History Month," there is STILL very little light shed on "the Black experience" in the USA in their history courses. So... he updated and modified the "booklet" as a stimulating, easy-to-read, but "challenging primer" for those interested in further exploring or teaching the subject. ("What the WORLD Should Know About... Black History In The USA" - only 22 pages, with generous illustrations.) Luttrell lives today outside Boston, MA and is working on projects that promote the concept of "global community" and the importance of understanding the interdependence of ALL countries on a healthy "global economy.

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