Wheeler's Graded Studies in Great Authors: And a Complete Speller

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W.H. Wheeler & Company, 1899 - English language - 224 pages
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A manual for teaching spelling by quotations illustrating the use of each word.
 

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Love using this book with my children. The quotes from these famous authors are beautiful.

Contents

I
9
II
10
III
11
IV
12
V
13
VI
14
VII
15
VIII
16
XCV
119
XCVI
120
XCVII
121
XCVIII
122
XCIX
123
C
124
CI
125
CII
126

IX
17
X
18
XI
21
XII
22
XIII
23
XIV
24
XV
25
XVI
26
XVII
27
XVIII
28
XIX
29
XX
30
XXI
31
XXII
32
XXIII
33
XXIV
34
XXV
35
XXVI
36
XXVII
39
XXVIII
40
XXIX
41
XXX
42
XXXI
43
XXXII
44
XXXIII
45
XXXIV
46
XXXV
47
XXXVI
48
XXXVII
49
XXXVIII
50
XXXIX
51
XL
52
XLI
53
XLII
54
XLIII
57
XLIV
58
XLV
59
XLVI
60
XLVII
61
XLVIII
62
XLIX
63
L
64
LI
65
LII
66
LIII
67
LIV
68
LV
69
LVI
70
LVII
71
LVIII
72
LIX
73
LX
74
LXI
75
LXII
76
LXIII
79
LXIV
80
LXV
81
LXVI
82
LXVII
83
LXVIII
84
LXIX
85
LXX
86
LXXI
89
LXXII
90
LXXIII
91
LXXIV
92
LXXV
93
LXXVI
94
LXXVII
95
LXXVIII
96
LXXIX
99
LXXX
100
LXXXI
101
LXXXII
102
LXXXIII
103
LXXXIV
104
LXXXV
105
LXXXVI
106
LXXXVII
109
LXXXVIII
110
LXXXIX
111
XC
112
XCI
113
XCII
114
XCIII
115
XCIV
116
CIII
129
CIV
130
CV
131
CVI
132
CVII
133
CVIII
134
CIX
135
CX
136
CXI
139
CXII
140
CXIII
141
CXIV
142
CXV
143
CXVI
144
CXVII
145
CXVIII
146
CXIX
149
CXX
150
CXXI
151
CXXII
152
CXXIII
153
CXXIV
154
CXXV
155
CXXVI
156
CXXVII
159
CXXVIII
160
CXXIX
161
CXXX
162
CXXXI
163
CXXXII
164
CXXXIII
165
CXXXIV
166
CXXXV
169
CXXXVI
170
CXXXVII
171
CXXXVIII
172
CXXXIX
173
CXL
174
CXLI
175
CXLII
176
CXLIII
177
CXLIV
178
CXLV
179
CXLVI
180
CXLVII
181
CXLVIII
182
CXLIX
183
CL
184
CLI
185
CLII
186
CLIII
187
CLIV
188
CLV
191
CLVI
192
CLVII
193
CLVIII
194
CLIX
195
CLX
196
CLXI
197
CLXII
198
CLXIII
199
CLXIV
200
CLXV
201
CLXVI
166
CLXVII
167
CLXVIII
168
CLXIX
169
CLXX
170
CLXXI
171
CLXXII
172
CLXXIII
173
CLXXIV
174
CLXXV
175
CLXXVI
176
CLXXVII
177
CLXXVIII
178
CLXXIX
179
CLXXX
180
CLXXXI
181
CLXXXII
182
CLXXXIII
183
CLXXXIV
184
CLXXXV
185
CLXXXVI
186
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Popular passages

Page 150 - I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses; I linger by my shingly bars; I loiter round my cresses ; • And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 51 - There is not wind enough to twirl The one red leaf, the last of its clan, That dances as often as dance it can, Hanging so light, and hanging so high, On the topmost twig that looks up at the sky.
Page 180 - It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity; The gentleness of heaven broods o'er the Sea: Listen!
Page 150 - I CHATTER over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow.
Page 196 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then Heaven tries earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays: Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Page 109 - Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed— and gazed— but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought...
Page 161 - There's a dance of leaves in that aspen bower, There's a titter of winds in that beechen tree, There's a smile on the fruit and a smile on the flower, And a laugh from the brook that runs to the sea.
Page 176 - O sleep, O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Page 122 - I care not, fortune, what you me deny ; You cannot rob me of free nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face, You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve : Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
Page 184 - There at the foot of yonder nodding beech That wreathes its old fantastic roots so high, His listless length at noontide would he stretch, And pore upon the brook that babbles by.

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