When Sorry Isn't Enough: The Controversy Over Apologies and Reparations for Human Injustice

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Roy L. Brooks
NYU Press, 1999 - Law - 536 pages

"How much compensation ought to be paid to a woman who was raped 7,500 times? What would the members of the Commission want for their daughters if their daughters had been raped even once?"
—Karen Parker, speaking before the U.N. Commission on Human Rights

Seemingly every week, a new question arises relative to the current worldwide ferment over human injustices. Why does the U.S. offer $20,000 atonement money to Japanese Americans relocated to concentration camps during World War II, while not even apologizing to African Americans for 250 years of human bondage and another century of institutionalized discrimination? How can the U.S. and Canada best grapple with the genocidal campaigns against Native Americans on which their countries were founded? How should Japan make amends to Korean "comfort women" sexually enslaved during World War II? Why does South Africa deem it necessary to grant amnesty to whites who tortured and murdered blacks under apartheid? Is Germany's highly praised redress program, which has paid billions of dollars to Jews worldwide, a success, and, as such, an example for others?

More generally, is compensation for a historical wrong dangerous "blood money" that allows a nation to wash its hands forever of its responsibility to those it has injured?

A rich collection of essays from leading scholars, pundits, activists, and political leaders the world over, many written expressly for this volume, When Sorry Isn't Enough also includes the voices of the victims of some of the world's worst atrocities, thereby providing a panoramic perspective on an international controversy often marked more by heat than reason.

 

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Contents

A Reparations Success Story?
17
Nazi Ideology
23
Memories of My Childhood in the Holocaust
33
The Human Guinea Pigs of Ravensbrück
43
Extracts from
51
German Compensation for National Socialist Crimes
61
Romani Victims of the Holocaust
68
Institutionalized Insufficiency
77
Office of the Governor Pete Wilson State of California
291
The Distribution of Wealth Sovereignty and Culture
298
Suggested Readings
304
Not Even an Apology?
309
The Legal Status of African Americans during
317
African Americans under the Antebellum Constitution
325
Remembering Slavery
333
The Growing Movement for Reparations
341

What Form Redress?
87
The Jugun Ianfu System
95
Report of the Special
101
Japans Official Responses to Nanking
109
Japans Settlement of the PostWorld War II
135
A Legal Analysis
141
Lipinski Resolution
149
Japanese American Redress and the American
157
The Internment of Americans of Japanese Ancestry
165
Report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation
171
Japanese American Narratives
177
Redress Achieved 19831990
189
Confirming the Termination
201
The Case of the Japanese Peruvians
217
Suggested Readings
228
Five Hundred Years
241
The Killing of Big Snake a Ponca Chief
251
The Massacre at Wounded Knee South Dakota
252
Indian Claims for Reparations Compensation
261
The True Nature of Congresss Power over Indian
273
Repatriation Must Heal Old Wounds
283
Why the North and South Should Have Apologized
347
Camille Paglias Online Advice
353
for Remorse
355
Forty Acres and a Mule
365
Collective Rehabilitation
372
Suggested Readings
390
The Triumph of White Supremacy
401
Jim Crow Narratives
407
The United States Has Already Apologized
413
Strategic Considerations
422
Rosewood
435
What Price Reconciliation?
443
African National Congress Statement to
451
Truth and Reconciliation Commission Amnesty
457
Alternatives and Adjuncts to Criminal Prosecutions
469
Will the Amnesty Process Foster Reconciliation
487
Introductory Notes to the Presentation of the Truth
501
Contributors
515
About the Editor
536
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Roy L. Brooks is Warren Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of San Diego and author, most recently, of Critical Procedure and Integration or Separation?: A Strategy for Racial Equality.

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