When Your Children Marry: How Marriage Changes Relationships with Sons and Daughters

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, May 5, 2011 - Family & Relationships - 184 pages
0 Reviews
Marriage is an important transition in the life of any adult who marries. But often when a son or daughter gets married, their relationships with their natal families changes. It is often said that a 'daughter is a daughter all of her life, but a son is a son 'til he takes him a wife.' This book examines how marriage changes relationships between adult children and their parents and how this differs for sons versus daughters. Merrill considers the process by which men 'get pulled into' their wives' families and the ways in which men are sometimes more connected to their wives' families following marriage than to their own families. But what is it about a relationship with a son that changes when he marries? And why do daughters tend to stay closer? Why do mothers experience greater difficulty in negotiating relationships with married sons than with married daughters? Why do daughters tend to stay closer and maintain stronger ties to their natal families than sons do? This book answers these questions and offers advice for mothers on how to maintain strong ties with their children when they marry, negotiate relationships that may be fraught with new challenges, and accept changes when they happen. Sharing firsthand accounts from mothers, sons, and daughters, the author sheds new light on this neglected topic.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Illustrations of Intergenerational Relationships
9
Relationships between Parents and Adult Children
23
Gender Differences in Contact with Parents and InLaws
35
A Daughter Is a Daughter All of Her Life but a Son Is a Son til He Takes Him a Wife
49
The Effect of Marriage on Intergenerational Relationships
61
The Challenge for Mothers in ParentAdult Child Relationships
71
The Evolution of Intergenerational Relationships Following Childrens Marriages
81
Reciprocal Effects
111
Conclusion
121
Methodology
133
Interview Guidelines
139
Notes
147
Bibliography
161
Index
167
About the Author
171

Divorce and LaterLife Families
91
Advice to Mothers for Maintaining Intergenerational Relationships
101

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Deborah M. Merrill is associate professor of sociology at Clark University. She is the author of Mothers-in-Law and Daughters-in-Law: Understanding the Relationship and What Makes Them Friends or Foe and Caring for Elderly Parents: Juggling Work, Family, and Care Giving in Middle And Working Class Families.

Bibliographic information