When in Doubt, Tell the Truth: And Other Quotations from Mark Twain

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Columbia University Press, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 142 pages
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Representative works are interpreted in light of the two great political movements of the nineteenth century: the abolition of slavery and the women's rights movement. By reexamining Emerson, Poe, Melville, Douglass, Walt Whitman, Chopin, and Faulkner and others, Rowe assesses the degree to which major writers' attitudes toward race, class, and gender contribute to specific political reforms in nineteenth and twentieth-century American culture.

 

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Contents

Armor
8
VI
17
Citizenship
23
Conscience
29
Death and the Dead
35
Drama
41
Efficiency
44
Fantasy
50
Martyrdom
83
Narrative
89
Neerdowells
90
Overwork
96
Radicals
109
Republican Party the
112
Scripture
118
Talk
128

God
56
Heart the
62
Human Race the
65
Inheritance
71
Knowledge
77
Truth
134
Vulgarity
136
Youth
142
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Ian Armit is Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Historical Scotland and author of Beyond the Brochs.

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