White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Apr 28, 2000 - Social Science - 240 pages

The acclaimed work that debunks our myths and false assumptions about race in America

Maurice Berger grew up hypersensitized to race in the charged environment of New York City in the sixties. His father was a Jewish liberal who worshiped Martin Luther King, Jr.; his mother a dark-skinned Sephardic Jew who hated black people. Berger himself was one of the few white kids in his Lower East Side housing project.
Berger's unusual experience--and his determination to examine the subject of race for its multiple and intricate meanings--makes White Lies a fresh and startling book.
Berger has become a passionate observer of race matters, searching out the subtle and not-so-subtle manifestations of racial meaning in everyday life. In White Lies, he encourages us to reckon with our own complex and often troubling opinions about race. The result is an uncommonly honest and affecting look at race in America today--free of cant, surprisingly entertaining, unsettled and unsettling.

 

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WHITE LIES: Race and the Myths of Whiteness

User Review  - Kirkus

A book that is both immensely interesting and ultimately frustrating: part autobiographical vignettes, part a collection of anecdotes and quotes by whites and blacks on how each group perceives the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - autumnesf - LibraryThing

This book is a collection of thoughts,encounters,and writings on racism. I'm not sure what I expected when I picked it up, but it wasn't this collection of information from so many people. This is not ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
POWDER
NEGRO LOVER
SILENCE
TRASH
RAGE
CLASS
GAMES
NURSE
AFFIRMATIVE
ARTIFACT2 CORNERED
KNOWING
FEAR
WHITENESS
EPILOGUE April 4 1998
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About the author (2000)

Maurice Berger grew up in the Bernard Baruch Houses, a public housing project in New York City. He is a Senior Fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at the New School for Social Research. He lives in New York City.

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