Whitney's "Choice of Emblemes.": A Fac-simile Reprint, Volume 1

Front Cover
Lovell Reeve & Company, 1866 - Emblems - 440 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 312 - Though with their high wrongs I am struck to the quick, Yet with my nobler reason 'gainst my fury Do I take part : the rarer action is In virtue than in vengeance : they being penitent The sole drift of my purpose doth extend Not a frown further.
Page 308 - sorts ; Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor ; Who busied in hi% majesty surveys The singing masons building
Page 308 - art of order to a peopled kingdom. They have a king and officers of sorts ; Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor ; Who busied in
Page 297 - Here are sever'd lips, Parted with sugar-breath : so sweet a bar Should sunder such sweet friends. Here in her hairs The painter plays the spider, and hath woven A golden mesh to entrap the hearts of men, Faster than gnats in cobwebs : but her eyes,— I
Page 296 - All that glisters is not gold ; Often have you heard that told : Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold : Gilded tombs do worms infold. Had you been as wise as bold, Young in limbs, in
Page 312 - The sin of Judah is written with a pen of iron, and with the point of a diamond : it is graven upon the table of their heart and upon the horns of your altar.
Page 310 - But for supporting robbers ; shall we now Contaminate our fingers with base bribes 1 And sell the mighty space of our large honours, For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
Page 296 - О hell ! what have we here ? A carrion Death, within whose empty eye There is a written scroll ! I'll read the writing. All that glisters is not gold ; Often have you heard that told : Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold : Gilded tombs do worms infold. Had you been as wise as bold, Young in limbs, in
Page 307 - To keep thee from the tempest of the field. Clif. I am resolved to bear a greater storm Than any thou canst conjure up to-day, And that I'll write upon thy burgonet, Might I but know thee by thy household badge. War. Now by my
Page 307 - mountain top the cedar shows That keeps his leaves in spite of any storm) Even to affright thee with the view thereof. Clif. And from thy burgonet I'll rend thy bear, And tread it under foot with all contempt, Despite the

About the author (1866)

Writing under the pseudonym Henry Green, Henry Vincent Yorke kept his life as a wealthy industrialist separate from his literary persona. Although he had friends who were authors, he did not travel in literary circles and refused to be photographed, to protect his anonymity. Yorke was born in 1905 in Gloucestershire, England, and worked as a laborer before becoming managing director of a food engineering firm. From the publication of his first book Blindness (1926), which was begun when he was 17 years old and a student at Eton, he was admired for his unfailing sense of dialogue and characterization for all classes of British life. Green's last novel, Nothing, was published in 1950. Although he is still relatively unknown in the United States, he is recognized by authors such as John Updike and W. H. Auden as a masterful storyteller and one of the greatest English writers of the 20th century. He died in 1973

Bibliographic information