Why Am I Still Depressed? Recognizing and Managing the Ups and Downs of Bipolar II and Soft Bipolar Disorder

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McGraw Hill Professional, Mar 10, 2006 - Health & Fitness - 304 pages
3 Reviews

Tried everything but still not feeling better?

If your depression keeps coming back or is even getting worse, then you may be suffering from bipolar II or “soft” bipolar disorder. Commonly misdiagnosed, these mood disorders are characterized by recurring bouts of depression along with anxiety, irritability, mood swings, sleep problems, or intrusive thoughts.

Why Am I Still Depressed? shows you how to identify if you have a nonmanic form of bipolar disorder and how to work with your doctor to safely and effectively treat it.

Author James R. Phelps, M.D., gives you the latest tools and knowledge so you can:

  • Understand the Mood Spectrum, a powerful new tool for diagnosis
  • Know all your treatment options, including mood-stabilizing medications and research-tested psychotherapies
  • Examine the potential hazards of taking antidepressant medications
  • Manage your condition with exercise and lifestyle changes
  • Help family and friends with this condition understand their diagnosis and find treatment
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Great book for Bipolar Treatments

User Review  - greatsigns - Overstock.com

This book is particular helpful for the average person wanting to understand Bipolar treatments. For instance why mood stablizers are so important. It also helps you talk about treatments with your doctors. Read full review

Review: Why Am I Still Depressed?: Recognizing and Managing the Ups and Downs of Bipolar II and Soft Bipolar Disorder

User Review  - Elaine De - Goodreads

Important to read for anyone with depression or Bipolar. Read full review

Contents

Finding and Using the Right Treatment
101
Concluding Thoughts
251
Selected References
255
Index
263
Copyright

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Page x - I firmly believe that if the whole materia medica, as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind, — and all the worse for the fishes.
Page 7 - The disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of a chronic psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia or delusional disorder. G. The symptoms are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (eg...
Page 15 - ... more talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking 4) flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing 5) distractibility (ie, attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli) 6) increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation 7) excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences...
Page 15 - ... sleep) (3) more talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking (4) flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing (5) distractibility...
Page 15 - During the period of mood disturbance, at least three of the following symptoms have persisted (four if the mood is only irritable) and have been present to a significant degree: (1) inflated self-esteem or grandiosity (2) decreased need for sleep, eg, feels rested after only three hours of sleep (3) more talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking (4) flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing (5) distractibility, ie, attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant...
Page 6 - Major Depressive Syndrome" is defined as criterion A below. A. At least five of the following symptoms have been present during the same two-week period and represent a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either (1) depressed mood, or (2) loss of interest or pleasure.
Page 217 - Men are disturbed not by things, but by the view which they take of them
Page 16 - The episode is associated with an unequivocal change in functioning that is uncharacteristic of the person when not symptomatic. D. The disturbance in mood and the change in functioning are observable by others. E. The episode is not severe enough to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning, or to necessitate hospitalization, and there are no psychotic features.
Page 258 - Hoeger KM, Kochman L, Wixom N, Craig K, Miller RK, Guzick DS. A randomized, 48-week, placebo-controlled trial of intensive lifestyle modification and/or metformin therapy in overweight women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a pilot study.
Page 15 - ... (ie, attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli) 6 increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation 7 excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (eg, the person engages in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments).

References to this book

Madness: A Bipolar Life
Marya Hornbacher
No preview available - 2008

About the author (2006)

James R. Phelps, M.D., has been practicing psychiatry for more than fifteen years and specializes in treating bipolar disorder. He speaks on bipolar disorder throughout the Pacific Northwest. Dr. Phelps has authored journal articles for American Journal of Medicine, Academic Psychiatry, Journal of Affective Disorders, and Academic Medicine. For more information visit his website PsychEducation.org.

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