Why Don't We Do It in the Road?: The Beatles Phenomenon

Front Cover
Information Architects, 2006 - Music - 240 pages
0 Reviews
In Why Don?t We Do It In The Road? the author looks back to the 1960s and the global phenomenon surrounding four young men from Liverpool . . .The names and the songs are well known, but the ?why?? is more difficult to assess - even with hindsight - against the glare of the music industry?s powerful myth-making apparatus. . .John Astley deploys his forensic skills as a sociologist todevelop an original take on the kaleidoscopic landscape that gave birth to The Beatles phenomenon . . .The reader is invited to take a peep back into the recent past - at the post-War years in England. . .the trembling class structure of an exhausted society. . .and the advent of global communicationsin the 1960s as the music industry and British culture is unmade and remade . . .Put another way, ?Why Don?t We DoIt In The Road?? is question that has gone answered for four decades - until now. John Astley is a writer and lecturer - and is a frequent contributor to journals, conferences, and radio talks. As a sociologist of culture, he is also the author of three volumes of collected essays: Liberation & Domestication, Culture & Creativity, and Professionalism & Practice. John Astley is currently working on Herbivores and Carnivores, a timely investigation into cultural values in contemporary society.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 150 - ... a very Eden of the innate rights of man. There alone rule Freedom, Equality, Property and Bentham. Freedom, because both buyer and seller of a commodity, say of labour-power, are constrained only by their own free will. They contract as free agents, and the agreement they come to, is but the form in -which they give legal expression to their common will. Equality, because each enters into relation with the other, as with a simple owner of commodities...
Page 150 - Freedom, because both buyer and seller of a commodity, say of labour-power, are constrained only by their own free will. They contract as free agents, and the agreement they come to, is but the form in which they give legal expression to their common will. Equality, because each enters into relation with the other, as with a simple owner of commodities, and they exchange equivalent for equivalent. Property, because each disposes only of what is his own. And Bentham, because each looks only to himself.
Page 150 - He who was previously the moneyowner now strides out in front as a capitalist; the possessor of labourpower follows as his worker. The one smirks self-importantly and is intent on business; the other is timid and holds back, like someone who has brought his own hide to market and now has nothing else to expect but — a tanning.
Page 150 - The only force that brings them together and puts them in relation with each other, is the selfishness, the gain and the private interests of each.
Page 112 - When I'm wondering what's the best way to get a window open or how to force a door, how can I be thinking or have anything on my mind ? That's what the four-eyed white-smocked bloke with the note-book couldn't understand when he asked me questions for days and days after I got to Borstal; and I couldn't explain it to him then like I'm writing it down now; and even if I'd been able to maybe he still wouldn't have caught on because I don't know whether I can understand it myself even at this moment,...
Page 112 - As soon as I got to Borstal they made me a long-distance cross-country runner. I suppose they thought I was just the build for it because I was long and skinny for my age (and still am) and in any case I didn't mind it too much, to tell you the truth, because running had always been made much of in my family, especially running away from the police.
Page 104 - What has happened is that the pressure of restriction preceding nuclear suicide has precipitated a biological reflex compelling the leftist element in the young middle class to join with the delinquent element in the young working class for the reaffirmation of life by orgy and violence. What is happening is an evolutionary convulsion rather than a reformation. Young people are not correcting society. They are regurgitating it.
Page 178 - But I am saying that we should look not for the components of a product but for the conditions of a practice. When we find ourselves looking at a particular work, or group of works , often realizing, as we do so , their essential community as well as their irreducible individuality, we should find ourselves attending first to the reality of their practice and the conditions of the practice as it was then executed.
Page 150 - When we leave this sphere of simple circulation or the exchange of commodities, which provides the 'free-trader vulgaris' with his views, his concepts and the standard by which he judges the society of capital and wage-labour, a certain change takes place, or so it appears, in the physiognomy of our dramatis personae. He who was previously the moneyowner now strides out in front as a capitalist; the possessor of labourpower follows as his worker.
Page 33 - But all science would be superfluous if the outward appearance and the essence of things directly coincided.

About the author (2006)

John Astley is a sociologist, lecturer, and writer - and a frequent  contributor to journals, conferences, and radio talks.  As a sociologist of culture, he is the author of three volumes of collected essays: Liberation and Domestication, Culture and Creativity, and Professionalism and Practice  - as well as his well-known monograph on The Beatles phenomenon from a cultural studies perspective Why Don’t We Do It in the Road? 

 

In recent years, his essay Herbivores an Carnivores (2008) looked at the struggle for democratic values in post-War Britain. In 2010, the first edition of Access to Eden appeared as an examination of the rise and fall of public sector housing ideals in Britain.  

 

After many years living and working in Oxford, John Astley is now based in Devon.   

Bibliographic information