Why Girls Are Weird: A Novel

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jul 1, 2003 - Fiction - 320 pages
7 Reviews
She was just writing a story.
When Anna Koval decides to creatively kill time at her library job in Austin by teaching herself HTML and posting partially fabricated stories about her life on the Internet, she hardly imagines anyone besides her friend Dale is going to read them. He's been bugging her to start writing again since her breakup with Ian over a year ago. And so what if the "Anna K" persona in Anna's online journal has a fabulous boyfriend named Ian? It's not like the real Ian will ever find out about it.

The story started writing itself.
Almost instantly Anna K starts getting e-mail from adoring fans that read her daily postings religiously. One devotee, Tess, seems intent on becoming Anna K's real-life best friend and another, a male admirer who goes by the name of "Ldobler," sounds like he'd want to date Anna K if she didn't already have a boyfriend. Meanwhile, the real Anna can't help but wonder if her newfound fans like her or the alter ego she's created. It's only a matter of time before fact and fiction collide and force Anna to decide not only who she wants to be with, but who she wants to be.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Marlene-NL - LibraryThing

Just finished it and ran (well not really, I am on crutches) downstairs to get Why Moms are Weird thinking it was a sequel, but it is not. It took me a while to get into the book. Not that it was hard ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cms519 - LibraryThing

I enjoyed the author's writing on Television Without Pity. While I found parts of this book very funny (likely the parts that were right from the original journal) I was a bit disappointed. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
61
Section 3
73
Section 4
80
Section 5
88
Section 6
102
Section 7
119
Section 8
121
Section 17
199
Section 18
201
Section 19
203
Section 20
207
Section 21
214
Section 22
241
Section 23
245
Section 24
252

Section 9
125
Section 10
136
Section 11
142
Section 12
144
Section 13
149
Section 14
152
Section 15
161
Section 16
186
Section 25
260
Section 26
262
Section 27
278
Section 28
281
Section 29
305
Section 30
307
Section 31
309
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Pamela Ribon is a bestselling author, television writer and performer.  A pioneer in the blogging world, her first novel, Why Girls Are Weird, was loosely based on her extremely successful website pamie.com.  The site has been nominated for a Bloggie in Lifetime Achievement, which makes her feel old. Ribon created the cult sensation and tabloid tidbit Call Us Crazy:  The Anne Heche Monologues, a satire of fame, fandom and Fresno.  Her two-woman show, Letters Never Sent (created with four-time Emmy winner and Jay Leno Show favorite Liz Feldman) was showcased at the 2005 HBO US Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen.  She has been writing in television for the past seven years, in both cable and network, including on the Emmy-award winning Samantha Who? starring Christina Applegate.  Using her loyal Internet fan base, Ribon sponsors book drives for libraries in need.  Over the years, pamie.com has sent thousands of books and materials to Oakland and San Diego, sponsored a Tsunami-ravaged village of schoolchildren, and helped restock the shelves of a post-Katrina Harrison County, Mississippi.  Ribon’s book drive can now be found at DeweyDonationSystem.org, which has sponsored libraries from the Negril School in Jamaica to the Children’s Institute in Los Angeles. 

Bibliographic information