Why Innovation Fails

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1980 - Education - 224 pages
We know a lot about innovation in education--when it occurs, what forms it takes, or what steps it involves. But we don't know why it fails or succeeds. Arthur Levine's goal in writing this book was to understand how change can be accomplished successfully. His focus is on what happens after a change has been adopted.

Levine first offers a theory about change in organizations, based on the personality of the organization. He then examines his theory of change in a detailed study of fourteen structurally similar innovations in the experimental colleges at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He concludes with a review of other studies of universities as organizations in general, integrating his theory with other research on innovation in organizations.
 

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Contents

Some Questions
3
Some Answers
11
PART TWO A STUDY OF FOURTEEN INNOVATIONS
27
Continuing Institutionalization
89
How and Why Innovation Fails
155
A Literature Review
167
Appendix A Methodological Note
201
Appendix B A Synthesis of Theories
210
Index
218
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Arthur Levine is a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. He is also the author of three books on undergraduate education, particularly the changes on the late 1960s and early 1970s.

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