Why People Go to Psychiatrists

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Transaction Publishers, 1969 - Psychology - 373 pages
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This is the first examination in depth of the reasons and ways that people seek psychiatric help. Viewing contemporary metropolitan life from the standpoint of an experienced social analyst, Charles Kadushin deals with such issues as, why people believe they have emotional problems, what types of problems send them to psychiatrists, how, why, and by whom potential patients are told they are disturbed, why people choose psychiatry over other healing methods, and why many people do not receive treatment from the sources to which they apply.

The author develops a new theory of social circles, describing how people move in a network of friends and acquaintances with varying degrees of knowledge of and interest in psychiatry. This factor affects decisions to obtain professional help and also has bearing on the types of problems presented. The study encompasses a wide variety of persons in a complex community environment--New York City, the psychotherapy capital of the world. The basic data were obtained from 1,500 patients in ten psychiatric clinics in three major treatment areas medical, analytic, and religio-psychiatric.

The book provides new insights into the motivations of the patients as well as information about their social setting. It is an informative and engrossing work for students and scholars; for sociologists in the areas of medicine and mental health; for psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and social workers actively engaged in treatment and casework; and for all professionals in the community health field.

Charles Kadushin is professor emeritus of sociology at the graduate center of the City University of New York, distinguished scholar at the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish studies, and visiting research professor of sociology, Brandeis University. He has been a consultant to the New York City Department of Health, the Department of Mental Hygiene Research Unit, the Community Health Board, the Institute for International Education, and the Market Research Corporation of America. Professor Kadushin has contributed to a number of professional and scholarly journals, among them the American Sociological Review, New Society, and the American Journal of Psychiatry.

 

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Contents

The Decision to Go to a Psychiatrist
3
DataCollection in a Psychiatric Setting
25
Therapists Clinics and Patients The Organization of Outpatient Psychotherapy
34
The Theory of Our Friends
57
THE REALIZATION OF A PROBLEM
87
The Sociology of Presenting Problems
89
Presenting Problems and Psychiatric Diagnoses
110
The Effect of Sophistication Training and Social Reality on the Presentation of Self
130
THE DECISION TO GO TO A CLINIC
245
Searching for Information and Acquiring Knowledge
247
Hopes and Money Cognitions and Evaluations of Psychotherapy and Psychiatric Clinics
265
Personal Influence and the Last Straw
287
TOWARD BETTER COMMUNITY MENTALHEALTH PROGRAMS
305
Summary of Findings
307
Community Psychiatry and the Friends and Supporters of Psychotherapy Some Recommendations for Action
319
Appendix
341

INTERMEDIATE STEPS IN THE DECISION TO SEEK THERAPY
169
Free Advice
171
False Starts Previous Sources of Treatment
201
From Bartenders to Psychiatrists Images of the Professions
227

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