Why Universities Matter: A Conversation about Values, Means and Directions

Front Cover
Allen & Unwin, 2000 - Education - 254 pages
An angry response to attacks on universities by governments and their lackeys within universities.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Part One Value Perspectives
3
Truth and the university
26
The university and its public
49
Australian universities today
72
Ends and means in university policy decisions
85
Part Two Specific Concerns
99
Academic autonomy
110
Competition and collegiality
144
Part Three Looking Ahead
159
the costs
186
a contestable future
214
The body in question
235
Index
250
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 42 - Arendt (1958) argues that education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough to assume responsibility for it and by the same token save it from that ruin which, except for renewal, except for the coming of the new and the young, would be inevitable.
Page 3 - In a higher world it is otherwise ; but here below to live is to change, and to be perfect is to have changed often.
Page 18 - A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill.
Page 46 - Think of your breed; for brutish ignorance Your mettle was not made; you were made men, To follow after knowledge and excellence. As if I also was hearing it for the first time: like the blast of a trumpet, like the voice of God. For a moment I forget who I am and where I am.
Page 47 - Bach. I cannot think of doing otherwise. It is a sort of benediction on the house. But that is not its only meaning for me. It is a rediscovery of the world of which I have the joy of being a part. It fills me with awareness of the wonder of life, with a feeling of the incredible marvel of being a human being.
Page 47 - For the past eighty years I have started each day in the same manner. It is not a mechanical routine but something essential to my daily life. I go to the piano and I play two preludes and fugues of Bach. I cannot think of doing otherwise. It is a sort of benediction on the house. But that is not its only meaning it has for me.
Page 39 - ... in a picture if it represented the Eucharist. What is sacred in science is truth; what is sacred in art is beauty. Truth and beauty are impersonal. All this is too obvious. If a child is doing a sum and does it wrong, the mistake bears the stamp of his personality. If he does the sum exactly right, his personality does not enter into it at all. Perfection is impersonal. Our personality is the part of us which belongs to error and sin. The whole effort of the mystic has always been to become such...
Page 42 - Education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough to assume responsibility for it and by the same token save it from that ruin which, except for renewal, except for the coming of the new and young, would be inevitable. And education, too, is where we decide whether we love our children enough not to expel them from our world and leave them to their own devices, nor to strike from their hands their chance of undertaking something new, something unforeseen by us, but to prepare...
Page 165 - ... should develop their activities and carry out their tasks. In a free society, universities are not expected to bend all their energies towards meeting so-called national objectives which, if not those of a monolithic society are usually themselves illdefined or subject to controversy and change. One of the roles of a university in a free society is to be the conscience and critic of that society; such a role cannot be fulfilled if the university is expected to be an arm of government policy....
Page 39 - ... to see things as they are rather than as one would wish them to be, or how they appear from this or that perspective.

References to this book

Engaging Teachers
Trevor Gale
Limited preview - 2003

About the author (2000)

Professor Tony Coady's Centre for Philosophy and Public Issues at the University of Melbourne specialises in examining the role of ethics when applied to practical circumstances. He's the editor of the 'Ethics and Public Life' series. Contributors are Judith Brett, Morag Fraser, Raimond Gaita, Peter Karmel, Tony Klein, Bruce Langtry, Stuart Macintyre, Jane Marceau, Simon Marginson, Janet McCalman, Seumas Miller, and John Molony.

Bibliographic information