Wild Man: The Life and Times of Daniel Ellsberg

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Palgrave Macmillan, Jun 9, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 692 pages
On September 4, 1971, the office of Lewis Fielding, a psychiatrist practicing in Los Angeles, was broken into. It looked like a run of the mill drug raid. A month later, a homeless man was charged with burglary and the case was considered closed. On June 17, 1972, five men were charged with breaking and entering at the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. With these two burglaries, one seemingly innocuous while the other was more serious because of the venue, the scandal known as Watergate was born. As the tale of Richard Nixon and his Plumbers began to unfold, it was discovered that one of Lewis Fielding's patients was Daniel Ellsberg, the man who released the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times . Ellsberg was high on Nixon's list of enemies and he vowed to destroy him at all costs. In Wild Man , Tom Wells explores the life of Daniel Ellsberg to discover what makes an individual enact the most severe breach of government security ever to occur in the United States. As Wells follows Ellsberg from his early days as a piano prodigy to his years of great promise at Harvard, we see the development of a volatile, narcissistic loner with a voracious sexual appetite, a highly developed intelligence and, most importantly, the overwhelming need to take centre stage in the pageant known as America. In Wild Man , Tom Wells creates an unforgettable picture of Daniel Ellsberg, an American Everyman for the seventies who embodied the promise and paranoia of that uncertain time. This is a thrilling piece of biography that will stand as one of the great American portraits.
 

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Wild man: the life and times of Daniel Ellsberg

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Daniel Ellsberg gained notoriety in 1971 when he released the Pentagon Papers, a massive 7000-page secret history of American failings in Vietnam, to reporter Neil Sheehan of the New York Times. Wells ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue Breakin
1
Loner
33
Outsider
53
Liberated
81
Soldier and Theorist
107
Supergenius
133
Rejection
169
Damaged Goods
195
Were All War Criminals
365
Battle Mode
413
Boomerang
459
On Stage
505
Outcast
557
Interviews
605
Ahhreviations
607
Notes
609

Death Wish
229
Wild Man
271
Friend or Country?
321

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About the author (2001)

Tom Wells is the author of The War Within: America's Battle with Vietnam. He lives in Boulder, CO.

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