Wild Pigs in the United States: Their History, Comparative Morphology, and Current Status

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University of Georgia Press, Mar 1, 2008 - Nature - 336 pages
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The information in this volume relates to the country's three prevalent wild pig types: the introduced Eurasian wild boar, the feral (once domestic, now wild) hog, and hybrids of the two. The first section of the book presents a history of wild pigs in this country-their origins; when, where, and by whom they were first introduced; and their subsequent dispersal. John J. Mayer and I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr. then develop specific criteria, based on taxonomic principles, for differentiating between the wild pig types. Employing numerous illustrations, graphs, and tables, they analyze and compare morphometric and discrete characters of the skull, external body dimensions and proportions, coat colorations patterns, and hair structure and form. A report on the status of wild pig populations in the United States (as of 1991) completes the volume. Aided by the book's wealth of current data, biologists and wildlife managers can make informed decisions about such issues as state versus private ownership of wild pig populations and the status of wild pigs as pests or game animals. In addition, hunters and sportsmen, zoologists, and even specialized historians and archaeologists will find Wild Pigs in the United States useful and informative. John J. Mayer is a senior research scientist at Westinghouse Savannah River Company. I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr. is a senior research scientist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. "It is evident that Mayer and Brisbin have meticulously researched the populations described in this book. . . . This book is a notably objective work and is one of the best references available on wild pigs. It represents an ordered, concise history that is easily followed. . . . Anyone needing information on wild pigs should find it a useful reference."-Journal of Wildlife Management, Vol. 57, No. 2, 1993 "An important book that will likely become the definitive text on the status and history of wild pigs in the United States . . . Moreover, it stands as one of the finest studies of the invasion of an exotic species and of the interplay between a domestic animal and its feral relatives."-Conservation Biology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1992 "Thorough, well written . . . It should serve as an important reference for professional mammalogists and those employed by federal and state wildlife agencies."-ASB Bulletin, Vol. 39, No. 3, 1992
 

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Contents

Native range of Eurasian wild boar
2
Lineages of U S wild pig populations
3
History of the Introduction
6
Syndactylous versus dyadactylous feet of swine
18
Distribution of feral swine on the U S DOE Savannah River Plant
41
Range of wild boar population in Vermont and New Hampshire
48
Comparative Morphology
72
Toothwear rating method
83
Sixteen linear dental measurements
90
Seven external body measurements
92
Adult male cranial and mandibular analyses of the four target groups
94
Yearling cranial and mandibular analyses of the four target groups
110
Current Status
203
Conclusions
225
Nomenclature of Domestic and Feral Swine
267
Literature Cited
287

Twentyfive linear cranial measurements
85
Two linear cranial measurements and one cranial angle
86
Six linear mandibular measurements
88

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Popular passages

Page 296 - Guide to the Domesticated Animals (other than Horses) exhibited in the Central and North Halls of the British Museum (Natural History).
Page 292 - Martin. 1975. Cellular characteristics of skeletal muscle in selected strains of pigs and mice and the unselected controls. Growth 39:95.
Page 287 - J. and HW Setzer, eds.), The Mammals of Africa : an identification manual. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC ROSEVEAR, DR, 1969.
Page 299 - PRESTWOOD, AK, FE KELLOGG, SR PURSGLOVE, AND FA HAYES. 1975. Helminth parasitisms among intermingling insular populations of whitetailed deer, feral cattle, and feral swine.

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About the author (2008)

John J. Mayer is a senior research scientist at Westinghouse Savannah River Company. I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr. is a senior research scientist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory.

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