Wilde Complete Plays: Lady Windermere's Fan; An Ideal Husband; The Importance of Being Earnest; A Woman of No Importance; Salome; The Duchess of Padua; Vera, or the Nihilists; A Florentine Tragedy; La Sainte Courtisane

Front Cover
A&C Black, Jan 1, 2009 - Drama - 624 pages
0 Reviews
This volume contains everything Wilde wrote in dramatic form



Wilde's masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest is printed here in its usual three-act form, but with an appendix containing the best material from the original four-act version. Also included are his three 'problem plays', Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance and An Ideal Husband, as well as his once-banned Salome and several other little-known but fascinating dramas. H. Montgomery Hyde, an acknowledged expert on Wilde and author of several books on him, provides an introduction to Wilde's life and work with special attention to the composition and performance of the plays.

"Wilde is to me our only thorough playwright. He plays with everything: with wit, with philosophy, with drama, with actors and audiences, with the whole theatre" (George Bernard Shaw)


 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Chronology
Introduction
II
Lady Windermeres Fan
First Act
Second Act
Third Act
Fourth Act
Third Act
Fourth Act
Salomé
SCENE
The Duchess of Padua
First Act
Second Act
Third Act

An Ideal Husband
First Act
Second Act
Third Act
Fourth Act
The Importance ofBeing Earnest
First Act
Second Act
Third Act
Appendix
The Gribsby Scene
A Woman of No Importance
First Act
Second Act
Fourth Act
Fifth Act
Vera or The Nihilists
Prologue
First Act
Second Act
Third Act
Fourth Act
A Florentine Tragedy
SCENE
SCENE
Footnote
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (b. Dublin, 1854) was an Irish playwright, who wrote one of the best loved comedies in the English language - The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). A leading wit and conversationalist in London society, his career was destroyed at its height when he was imprisoned for homosexual offences. Wilde was born in Dublin and educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and Magdalen College, Oxford. Settling in London, he became famous for his extravagant dress, long hair, and paradoxical views on art, literature, and morality. His first play, Vera (1880), a tragedy about Russian nihilists, was produced in New York to poor reviews. Success in the theatre came with the elegant drawing-room comedy Lady Windermere's Fan. A Woman of No Importance (1893) was another success. Other works for the theatre were An Ideal Husband (1895) and the biblical Salomé (1896), written in French for Sarah Bernhardt. Wilde flaunted his homosexual affairs, including his ill-fated liaison with Lord Alfred Douglas. Following a celebrated trial in 1895 he was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour. The sentence led to public humiliation, poor health, and bankruptcy. On his release in 1897 he left for France and remained in exile there until his death in 1900.

Bibliographic information