Wildernesses and primitive areas in southwestern national forests

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The Region, 1999 - Nature - 62 pages
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Page 1 - A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.
Page 1 - Act, an area of undeveloped Federal land retaining its primeval character and influence, without permanent improvements or human habitation, which is protected and managed so as to preserve its natural conditions and which ( 1 ) generally appears to have been affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man's work substantially unnoticeable...
Page 4 - ... and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter. Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water, camp, and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products. To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 200 feet away from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. Scatter strained dishwater.
Page 6 - For purposes of paragraph (1), the term "wheelchair" means a device designed solely for use by a mobility-impaired person for locomotion, that is suitable for use in an indoor pedestrian area. SEC. 508. TRANSVESTITES. For the purposes of this Act, the term "disabled" or "disability" shall not apply to an individual solely because that individual is a transvestite.
Page 4 - Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry. Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light. Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires. Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand. Burn all wood and coals to ash, put out campfires completely, then scatter cool ashes.
Page 4 - Dispose of Waste Properly Pack it in. pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter. Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water, camp, and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.
Page 4 - Inspect your campsite for your stay. Pack out all trash; yours and others'. Leave What You Find • Treat our natural heritage with respect. Leave plants, rocks, and historical artifacts as you find them. • Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site should not be necessary.
Page 15 - Its 10,912-foot elevation provides marvelous vistas. It is home to several pristine, high elevation meadows which are comprised of relatively rare plant associations. Notable landmarks in or just outside the wilderness include Profanity Ridge, Terry Flat, Toolbox Draw, and the Punchbowl.

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