William Carey

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Hodder and Stoughton, 1881 - Baptists - 214 pages
 

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Page 43 - Enlarge the place of thy tent, And let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations : Spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes ; For thou shalt break forth on the right hand and on the left; And thy seed shall inherit the Gentiles, And make the desolate cities to be inhabited.
Page 210 - I John, who also am your brother, and companion in tribulation, and in the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ, was in the isle that is called Patmos, for the word of God, and for the testimony of Jesus Christ.
Page 39 - Young man, sit down! When God pleases to convert the heathen he will do it without your aid or mine.
Page 89 - Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, When it is in the power of thine hand to do it. Say not unto thy neighbour, Go, and come again, And to-morrow I will give; When thou hast it by thee.
Page 36 - Be of good comfort, Master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 166 - Committee, that it is the duty of this country to promote the interest and happiness of the native inhabitants of the British dominions in India, and that such measures -ought to be adopted, as may tend to the introduction among them of useful knowledge, and of religious and moral improvement.
Page 97 - Finally, let us give ourselves unreservedly to this glorious cause. Let us never think that our time, our gifts, our strength, our families, or even the clothes we wear are our own. Let us sanctify them all to God and His cause.
Page 49 - So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gospel to you that are at Rome also.
Page 192 - In every walk ! — that here may shoot Thy scions, and thy buds expand, A hundred from one root Thrice welcome, little English flower ! To me the pledge of hope unseen ; When sorrow would my soul o'erpower For joys that were, or might have been, I'll call to mind, how, fresh and green, I saw thee waking from the dust ; Then turn to heaven with brow serene. And place in God my trust.
Page 211 - For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption : But he whom God raised again saw no corruption.

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