William Goyen: selected letters from a writer's life

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University of Texas Press, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 427 pages
Proclaimed "one of the great American writers of short fiction" by the New York Times Book Review, William Goyen (1915-1983) had a quintessentially American literary career, in which national recognition came only after years of struggle to find his authentic voice, his audience, and an artistic milieu in which to create. These letters, which span the years 1937 to 1983, offer a compelling testament to what it means to be a writer in America. A prolific correspondent, Goyen wrote regularly to friends, family, editors, and other writers. Among the letters selected here are those to such major literary figures as W. H. Auden, Archibald MacLeish, Joyce Carol Oates, William Inge, Elia Kazan, Elizabeth Spencer, and Katherine Anne Porter. These letters constitute a virtual autobiography, as well as a fascinating introduction to Goyen' work. They add an important chapter to the study of American and Texas literature of the twentieth century.

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Contents

ONE Houston
1
TWO
89
THREE London
139
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Goyen was born in Trinity, Texas, served in World War II, and lived much of his life in Taos, New Mexico. He wrote numerous short stories, novels, poems, and plays.

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