William Hedley: The Inventor of Railway Locomotion on the Present Principle

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J.M. Carr, 1882 - Locomotives - 66 pages
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Page 13 - ... carriage at each handle for them to stand upon. I ascertained the proportion between the weight of the experimental carriage and the coal waggons at that point when the wheels of the carriage would surge or turn round without advancing it. The weight of the carriage and the number of waggons also were repeatedly varied, but with the same relative result. This experiment, which was on a large scale, was decisive of the fact, that the friction of the wheels of an engine carriage upon the rails...
Page 47 - Trevithick provided for the rims or tyres of his wheels, projections similar to the heads of nails, or otherwise made their surfaces uneven by cutting in their transverse grooves. Following up this provision, he further proposed that wherever, as in ascending elevations, any greater amount of the evil was to be apprehended, additional claws or nails should be projected from the rims of the wheels, in order more effectually to take hold of the road. A more elaborate invention was made the subject...
Page 46 - ... degree, if it should be found to have existence. They assumed that the adhesion of the smooth wheels of the carriage upon the equally smooth iron rail must necessarily be so slight, that if it should be attempted to drag any considerable weight, the wheels might indeed be driven round, but that the carriage would fail to advance because of the continued slipping of the wheels, or that, at best, a considerable part of the impelling power would be lost through their partial slipping.
Page 49 - ... legs and feet, and other contrivances, Blackett and Hedley, in 1813, made the important discovery that no such aids are required, the adhesion between smooth wheels and smooth rails being sufficient.
Page 14 - ... return again through the boiler into the chimney, now at the same end of the boiler as the fire-place. This was a most important improvement. The engine was placed upon four* wheels, and went well ; a short time after it commenced, it regularly drew eight loaded coal waggons after it, at the rate of from four to five miles per hour, on Wylam Eailroad, which was in a very bad state...
Page 13 - The engine had one cylinder and a fly-wheel; it went badly, the obvious fact being want of steam. Another engine was then constructed, the boiler was of malleable iron, the tube containing the fire was enlarged, and, in place of passing directly through the boiler into the chimney, it was made to return again through the boiler into the chimney, now at the same end of the boiler as the fire-place. This was a most important improvement. The engine was placed...
Page 48 - Wylam celebrity, appeared in the Illustrated London News of the 15th of October 1864:— "On the south side of the Museum are a couple of locomotive engines — old, very old — worn, bent, bruised, and rusty, but full of interest; for one is the oldest locomotive engine in existence, the parent of all that have since been produced— the original old
Page 15 - ... principle of locomotion by the friction or adhesion of the wheels upon the rails; and, further, that it was the engines on the Wylam Railroad that established the character of the locomotive engine in this district, as an efficient, and, as put into competition with horses in the conveying of coal waggons, an economical prime mover. After this statement, and which can be verified by many professional men in the district, I trust you will see the propriety in your future lectures of not designating...
Page 47 - ... progress caused by the engine, was taken up by several clever men, and for some years was the object of their inventive powers. One gentleman of considerable engineering talent, who had succeeded, to his own satisfaction, in providing substitutes for the hind legs of a horse, carried his desire of imitating nature so far, that he tasked himself to the production of a pair of front legs also ; and he had already made great progress in the composition of his factitious horse when the discovery...
Page 46 - It was, however, a question of the utmost importance, to ascertain if the adhesion of the wheels of the engine upon the .rails were sufficient to produce a progressive motion in the engine, when loaded with a train of carriages, without the aid of any other contrivance ; and it was, by the introduction and continued use of them upon the Wylam Rail-road, that this question was decided : and it was proved, that upon Rail-roads nearly level, or with very moderate inclination, the adhesion of the wheels...

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