William Preston Johnston's Work for a New South

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1900 - Education - 5 pages
 

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Page 1367 - Lee, to the chair of English literature in Washington and Lee University in Virginia. During this period he wrote the life of his father. In 1880 he was called to the presidency of the Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge, where he remained until his final position was found as president of Tulane University in New Orleans in 1884.
Page 1370 - ... in the cultivation of the literary and artistic life of New Orleans and the Southwest. Its 'graduates are admitted on equal terms to all the privileges of the university. This great work, which still remains far short of its own complete development at home, but in the future is to make a radical change in the entire organization of the secondary and higher education through the South, ia a good illustration of the imperative need of first-class leadership.
Page 1368 - University, he found the educational system in the midst of what might be called a struggle for existence. The university at Baton Rouge was without funds, in a hired house, with 39 students. The fifteen years of fearful political agitation since the days of '65 had made the proper development of the new public-school system almost an impossibility. In New Orleans the common school was practically in a state of siege, with the teachers unpaid and the educational public greatly discouraged.
Page 1368 - Orleans the common school was practically in a state of siege, with the teachers unpaid and the educational public greatly discouraged. The one thoroughly live spot in city and State seemed to be the University of Louisiana, an excellent collegiate school in New Orleans, doing more work on its moderate income of $10,000 a year than any similar institution in the State. The gift of Paul Tulane of...
Page 1367 - Johnston, iu 1831. After a miscellaneous preparatory schooling at home, he graduated at Yale, studied law at Louisville, and, in 1862, at the age of 31, became aidde-camp of President Davis till the close of the civil war. After several months of confinement as a political prisoner, he was called, in 1867, by General, then President, BE Lee, to the chair of English literature in Washington and Lee University in Virginia.
Page 1370 - Under the masterly administration of President BVB Dixon the Sophia Newcomb College has grown in ten short years into a genuine companionship with Tulane. By its conditions of admission it has sensibly lifted up the entire system of female seminaries in the city and State. Its new buildings, with their furnishings, are the most attractive spectacle in the new side of New Orleans.
Page 1368 - Johnston could sa.y on his deathbed, like Armstrong, that he was no longer a necessity in the institution which owed its existence and character essentially to his great personality. Armstrong, at Hampton, Va., solved the question of the true education of the negro — the question on which the whole future of the South...
Page 1367 - Johnston, in a work almost exclusively local, but of enduring value and increasing reputation, has achieved by the planting and nurture, in the very heart of the old South, under the most embarrassing circumstances, of the group of schools now included under the general title, Tulane University. With no disposition to depreciate the excellent work now being done in several of the more progressive colleges and universities in...
Page 1370 - ... races in their labor unions in New Orleans. Indeed, in this way the city teachers of New Orleans for several years received from Tulane University a course of instruction equivalent to a normal school of the broadest and highest grade. He began at once the development of the free public library which has grown into the present free library of the city.
Page 1369 - ... university anywhere. In the line of the famous maxim of Napoleon, "In any new departure, let the leaders alone and go direct to the people...

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