William Stokes: His Life and Work (1804-1878)

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1898 - Biography - 255 pages
 

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Page 148 - Sir Walter breathed his last, in the presence of all his children. It was a beautiful day — so warm, that every window was wide open — and so perfectly still, that the sound of all others most delicious to his ear, the gentle ripple of the Tweed over its pebbles, was distinctly audible as we knelt around the bed, and his eldest son kissed and closed his eyes.
Page 221 - He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
Page 217 - The blessing of him that, was ready to perish came upon him ; and he caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 142 - Again, even where the pulsations of the heart are not much increased in rapidity, it sometimes, when a loud murmur exists, becomes difficult to say with which sound the murmur is associated. The murmur may mask not only the sound with which it is properly synchronous, but also that with which it has no connection, so that in some cases even of regularly acting hearts, with a distinct systolic impulse, and the back stroke with the second sound, nothing is to be heard but one loud murmur.
Page 148 - The day was dark and lowering, and the wind high. The wide enclosure at the Abbey of Dryburgh was thronged with old and young ; and when the coffin was taken from the hearse, and again laid on the shoulders of the afflicted serving-men, one deep sob burst from a thousand lips.
Page 198 - ... principle, while we foster all things that relate to its moral, literary, and scientific character ? When this becomes our rule of action, then begins the real reform of all those things at which we fret and chafe. Then will medicine have its due weight in the councils of the country.
Page 21 - Stokes's heart. With an acute feeling of the degradation of his country, and a just and generous indignation against her oppressors, the tenderness and humanity of his disposition is such, that he recoils from any measures to be attempted for her emancipation which may terminate in blood : in this respect I have not the virtue to imitate him. I must observe, that...
Page 21 - ... of his disposition is such, that he recoils from any measures to be attempted for her emancipation which may terminate in blood : in this respect I have not the virtue to imitate him. I must observe, that, with this perhaps extravagant anxiety for the lives of others, I am sure in any cause which satisfied his conscience, no man would be more prodigal of his own life than Whitley Stokes, for he is an enthusiast in his nature, but "what he would highly that would he holily," and I am afraid that...
Page 139 - This treatment by muscular exercise is obviously more proper in younger persons than in those advanced in life. The symptoms of debility of the heart are often removable by a regulated course of gymnastics or by pedestrian exercise, even in mountainous countries, such as Switzerland or the Highlands of Scotland or Ireland. We may often observe in such persons the occurrence of what is commonly known as "getting the second wind...
Page 237 - Keeps his pale court in beauty and decay He came; and bought, with price of purest breath, A grave among the eternal.— Come away! Haste, while the vault of blue Italian day Is yet his fitting charnel-roof, while still He lies as if in dewy sleep he lay. Awake him not! surely he takes his fill Of deep and liquid rest, forgetful of all ill.

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