William Stokes: His Life and Work (1804-1878).

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1898 - 1 pages
 

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Page 169 - Use them after your own honour and dignity ; the less they deserve the more merit is in your bounty.
Page 21 - to be attempted for her emancipation which may terminate in blood. In this respect I have not the virtue to imitate him. I must observe that with this perhaps extravagant anxiety for the lives of others, I am sure that in any case
Page 217 - it gave witness to him ; the blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon him, and he caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. It has been said that the inscription on Fichte's funeral obelisk might be rightly graven on the tomb of Stokes: ' The teachers shall shine as the brightness of the firmament.' Equally suitable, I would venture to suggest, would be the proud words of Hippocrates—
Page 21 - on many material points and we differ on principles which do honour to Stokes' heart. With an acute feeling of the degradation of his country and a just and generous indignation against her oppressors, the tenderness and humanity of his disposition is such that he recoils from any
Page 138 - succeeded by feeble and short inspirations, which gradually increase in strength and depth until the respiratory act is carried to the highest pitch of which it seems capable, when the respirations, pursuing a descendant scale, regularly diminish until the
Page 221 - archaeologist, painter, musician, man of letters; as such and for himself revered and loved." The work was in every sense a labour of love. In all matters connected with art and literature there was a strong mutual sympathy between
Page 21 - heart. With an acute feeling of the degradation of his country and a just and generous indignation against her oppressors, the tenderness and humanity of his disposition is such that he recoils from any
Page 177 - membranes, in acute affections of the arachnoid, pericardium, pleura, and peritoneum, with which we were so familiar before the time in question, ceased in a great measure to make their appearance. The exudations were more or less hsemorrhagic, the effused lymph lying like a pasty covering
Page 101 - Oh ! that we could all unite in striving for civil and religious liberty that this fair and lovely land, for which God has done so much and man so little, might put forth its smothered energies which now burst forth only to ruin and destroy.
Page 165 - There is nothing more difficult than for a man who has been educated in a particular doctrine to free himself from it, even though he has found it to be wrong.

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