Win Your Lawsuit: Sue in California Superior Court Without a Lawyer

Front Cover
Nolo, Aug 16, 2010 - Law - 466 pages
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Represent yourself in California Superior Court for a case worth up to $25,000!
Some cases are too big for small claims court and too small to interest a lawyer. But Win Your Lawsuit takes you step by step through the entire process of a limited jurisdiction case in California Superior Court.

Take on common types of civil court cases worth up to $25,000, including:

  • contract disputes
  • personal injuries v
  • property damage cases
  • business disputes

    Whether you're bringing the suit or defending against one, this plain-English legal guide shows you how to prepare a complaint, file and serve papers, participate in settlement negotiations, present a case and much more. The 4th edition is completely updated and provides all the forms you need.

    Written by Roderic Duncan, a retired California Superior Court judge, this book includes the legal insight and practical tips that only a judge with over 25 years of experience can provide.
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    Contents

    3 Cant We Settle Somehow?
    35
    4 Deciding Where and Whom to Sue
    49
    5 Preparing the Complaint
    69
    6 Filing the Papers
    119
    7 Serving the Papers on the Defendants
    125
    8 Lawsuits from the Defendants Point of View
    135
    9 If Defendant Doesnt Respond
    167
    10 Discovery
    185
    13 Preparing for a Trial or Arbitration
    235
    14 Trial Before a Judge
    257
    15 Trial Before a Jury
    269
    16 After the Trial
    277
    17 Finding a Good Lawyer
    281
    Appendix TearOut Forms
    285
    Index
    431
    Related Products
    447

    Summary Judgment and Other Motions
    205
    12 Moving Your Case to Arbitration and Trial
    221

    Other editions - View all

    Common terms and phrases

    About the author (2010)

    Roderic Duncan was appointed to the California Municipal Court in 1975, and he was elected to the California Superior Court bench in 1987. Over the years, he has been a lecturer and faculty member at two dozen educational programs for judges. In 1990, he was chosen the Judicial Officer of the Year by the California State Bar, Family Law Section. Since retiring from the bench in 1995, he has been doing private judging and mediation.

    Bibliographic information