Winning the talent war: a strategic approach to attracting, developing, and retaining the best people

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John Wiley & Sons, Dec 22, 1999 - Business & Economics - 192 pages
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"High flyers" are high-potential employees expected to progress rapidly in their careers with the prospect of eventually filling senior positions. One cannot, however, simply recruit high flyers at will - to earn their status they must go through a necessary process of building an identity with the organization and developing loyalty to it. This book emphasizes the paradoxes involved in this process. It is a guide to the complex strategic issue of replenishing core leadership within the context of future uncertainty and within new organizational structures.

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Contents

Our changing world
3
the need for flexibility
13
What about the knowledge workers?
25
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (1999)

Charles Woodruffe has worked as a management consultant for fifteen years. His company -- Human Assets -- is based in London and specializes in creating and implementing strategies to ensure that clients have the staff they need, now and in the future, to fulfil their business strategies. Charles and his colleagues deal with choosing and developing people as well as with their motivation and retention. They work for a range of organizations in the private sector as well as having clients in the public sector. Present and past clients include NatWest Bank, Nomura International, Unisys, HSBC, Canada Life, ESSO and the Bank of England. Charles brings together his degrees in business and in psychology to find effective, practical and lasting solutions to the issues his clients face in the HR arena. He has published widely with articles in Leadership and Organizational Development Journal, People Management and Competency as well as earlier publications in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. His book on assessment centres is in its third edition. Charles can be contacted at: cw@humanassets.co.uk

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