Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes

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W.J. Johnston, 1880 - American fiction - 256 pages
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We are in the age of mass-produced novels, and they are difficult for me to read because of a) the low-level of target audience, and b) all the grammar and punctuation errors.
This book is
delightful from beginning to end. Predictable, yes, though not in every way. A look back at the culture of yesteryear, yes, in a good way. As a Morse code operator, with a grandfather who ran a key on the railroad, I enjoyed the way railroad code (not Morse code, BTW) laid the foundation for the romance.
The story, with its classical structure of love begun, love lost, and love regained, contains not just a delightful sense of romance, but a caution against gossip on the one hand and a lack of transparency on the other. Both of these are hazardous to one's health. The very end of the story is --- to me --- is delightfully tender and romantic.
Not a 5-star, because there are really 5-star books out there, but for anyone who loves to read well-written novels, this is surely a winner.
 

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I absolutely love this book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Contents

I
9
II
25
III
40
IV
64
V
76
VI
90
VII
103
VIII
117
IX
130
X
148
XI
166
XII
185
XIII
198
XIV
208
XV
215
XVI
239

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Page 25 - ... where she could amuse herself if she chose, by listening to and speculating upon the many messages of joy or of sorrow, of business and of pleasure, constantly going over the wire.
Page 248 - I have heard of young females so much in love that they would run after and pursue young men, but never before of one so carried away and so lost to every sense of decorum, as to be obliged to have a wire run from her room to his, in order to communicate with him at improper times...
Page 28 - For she was not the kind of girl to sit down and wait for some one to come along and marry her, and relieve her of the burden of selfsupport.
Page 245 - That any young woman should be so immodest as to establish telegraphic communication between her bed-room and the bed-room of two young men is beyond my comprehension...
Page 57 - Ah, well ! then the young woman was only in advance of the age," said Miss Archer; "and what with that and the telephone, and that dreadful phonograph that bottles up all one says and disgorges at inconvenient times, we will soon be able to do everything by electricity ; who knows but some genius will invent something for the especial use of lovers?
Page 176 - ... will drag in the mud, and clothes that every gust of wind catches, and in the other by prejudices and impediments of every kind, that the world, in consideration, doubtless, for her so-called ' weakness,
Page 170 - But yet—she sometimes felt that a certain something that had been on the wire was lacking now ; that Clem, while realizing all her old expectations of " C," was not exactly what "C
Page 93 - N !" something not impossible either, or even improbable; for fate is a sort of switch-board, and a slight move will switch two lives onto wires far asunder, even as the moving of a peg or two will alter everything on the board that shows its power so little.
Page 89 - Oh ! I can't express myself! It all comes upon me with a rush when I am alone, but now, at this supreme moment, I cannot tell you how I a...
Page 29 - But she had a presentiment that in time the charm would give place to monotony, more especially as, beyond a certain point, there was positively no advancement in the profession.

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