Wit and Mirth: Or, Pills to Purge Melancholy ; Being a Collection of the Best Merry Ballads and Songs, Old and New, Fitted to All Humours, Having Each Their Proper Tune for Either Voice, Or Instrument ...

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1719 - Ballads
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Page 329 - Sighing to himself and crying, Wretched I to love in vain; Ever scorning and denying, To reward your faithful Swain: Kiss me, Dear, before my Dying, Kiss me once and ease my pain.
Page 151 - Couch' d in the dark and silent grave, No ills of fate thou now canst fear ; In vain would tyrant power enslave, Or scornful beauty be severe. Wars that do fatal storms disperse, Far from thy happy mansion keep ; Earthquakes that shake the universe, Can't rock thee into sounder sleep. With all the charms of peace possest, Secure from life's tormentor, pain ; Sleep, and indulge thyself with rest, Nor dream thou e'er shalt rise again.
Page 2 - My pulse beats a dead march for lost repose, And to a solid lump of ice my poor fond heart is froze. Or say, ye powers, my peace to crown, Shall I thaw myself, and drown 25 Among the foaming billows'?
Page 133 - Would you have a young Virgin of fifteen Years, You must tickle her Fancy with sweets and dears, Ever toying, and playing, and sweetly, sweetly, Sing a Love Sonnet, and charm her Ears: Wittily, prettily talk her down, Chase her, and praise her, if fair or brown, Sooth her, and smooth her, And teaze her, and please her, And touch but her Smicket, and all's your own. A good deal subtler is the transformation of Durfey's song in The Country Wake, called "The Mouse Trap.
Page 151 - Couch'd in the dark and silent grave, No ills of fate thou now canst fear ; In vain would tyrant Power enslave, Or scornful Beauty be severe. Wars, that do fatal storms disperse, Far from thy happy mansion keep ; Earthquakes, that shake the universe, Can't rock thee into sounder sleep. With all the charms of peace possest, Secure from life's torment or pain, Sleep, and indulge thyself with rest ; Nor dream thou e'er shalt rise again*.
Page 333 - Match by long delaying ; The Gelding just now was led over the Course ; I think the Devil's in you for staying. Run, and endeavour all to bubble the Sporters ; Bets may recover all lost at the Groom Porters ; Follow, follow, follow, follow, come down to the Ditch, Take the odds, and then you'll be rich. " For I'll have the brown Bay, if the blew Bonnet ride, And hold a thousand pounds of his side, Sir ; Dragon would...
Page 177 - And to shew his shape doth cringe and scrape, But nothing has to say ; Or if the courtship's fine, He'll only cant and whine, And in confounded poetry, He'll goblins make divine ; I love the bold and brave, I hate the fawning slave, That quakes, and...
Page 301 - ... safely past the Rhine, And conquer'd all before him. With dull tea they fought in vain. Hopeless vict'ry to obtain ; Where sprightly wine fills ev'ry vein, Success must needs attend him. Our brains (like our cannons) warm, With often-firing feels no harm, While the sober sot flies the alarm, No lawrel can befriend him. Christians thus with conquest crown'd, Conquest with the glass goes round, Weak coffee can't keep its ground Against the force of claret : Whilst we give them thus the foil, And...
Page 333 - I'll have the brown Bay, if the blew bonnet ride, And hold a thousand Pounds of his side. Sir ; Dragon would scow'r • it, but Dragon grows old ; He cannot endure it, he cannot, he wonnot ' now run it. As lately he could : Age, age does hinder the Speed, Sir. Now, now, now they come on, and see, See the Horse lead the way still ; Three lengths before at the turning...

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