Witchcraft Confessions and Accusations

Front Cover
Mary Douglas
Psychology Press, 2004 - Social Science - 432 pages
Historians as well as anthropologists have contributed to this volume of studies on aspects of witchcraft in a variety of cultures and periods from Tudor England to twentieth-century Africa and New Guinea.
Contributors include: Mary Douglas, Norman Cohn, Peter Brown, Keith Thomas, Alan Macfarlane, Alison Redmayne, R.G. Willis, Edwin Ardener, Robert Brain, Julian Pitt-Rivers, Esther Goody, Peter Rivière, Anthony Forge, Godfrey Lienhardt, I.M. Lewis, Brian Spooner, G.I. Jones, Malcolm Ruel and T.O. Beidelman.
First published in 1970.
 

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Contents

NORMAN COHN
3
PETER BROWN
17
KEITH THOMAS
47
ALAN MACFARLANE
81
The county of Essex showing sample villages
85
ALISON REDMAYNE
103
Chikanga and surrounding area
104
R G WILLIS
129
PETER RIVIERE
245
ANTHONY FORGE
257
GODFREY L IENHARDT
279
A Structural Approach to Witchcraft and Spirit
293
BRIAN SPOONER
311
G I JONES
321
differential concern with
322
MALCOLM RUEL
333

EDWIN ARDENER
141
ROBERT BRAIN
161
JULIAN PITTRIVERS
183
ESTHER GOODY
207
T O BEIDELMAN
351
Notes on Contributors
357
Author Index
363
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About the author (2004)

Born in Italy, Mary Douglas was educated at Oxford University and began her career as a civil servant in 1943. Her first field research was carried out in what was then the Belgian Congo and she taught at Oxford and the University of London before moving to the United States in 1977. Purity and Danger (1966) is an essay about the logic of pollution beliefs, suggesting that ideas about dirt and disorder outline and reinforce particular social orders. Her other essays exploring the implicit meanings of cultural symbols follow a similar Durkheimian format. Her recent interests have turned to analysis of risk behavior and cross-cultural attitudes about food and alcohol.