With Fire and Sword: A Tale of the Past

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Federal Book Company, 1898 - Poland - 821 pages
2 Reviews
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nsenger - LibraryThing

With Fire and Sword must be one of the greatest historical epics you've never heard of. Set in the 17th century, and told from the Polish point of view, it recounts a Cossack uprising against the ... Read full review

Review: With Fire and Sword, Vol. 1 (The Trilogy #1)

User Review  - David (Dafydd) - Goodreads

A wonderfully ambitious novel reminiscent of War and Peace in its theme and scope. More tragic because it deals with civil war. Yet there is love, comradeship and laughter a plenty. I will order ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
III
17
IV
32
V
50
VI
70
VII
88
VIII
95
IX
101
XXXIV
427
XXXV
436
XXXVI
444
XXXVII
452
XXXVIII
467
XXXIX
473
XL
481
XLI
500

X
110
XI
120
XII
127
XIII
144
XIV
152
XV
158
XVI
171
XVII
192
XVIII
211
XIX
225
XX
238
XXI
248
XXII
270
XXIII
283
XXIV
292
XXV
301
XXVI
311
XXVII
333
XXVIII
353
XXIX
362
XXX
370
XXXI
382
XXXII
398
XXXIII
407
XLII
514
XLIII
521
XLIV
536
XLV
556
XLVI
562
XLVII
568
XLVIII
578
XLIX
586
L
594
LI
601
LII
616
LIII
624
LIV
631
LV
643
LVI
661
LVII
684
LVIII
719
LIX
733
LX
741
LXI
767
LXII
789
LXIII
800
LXIV
815
Copyright

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Page 363 - Madison dropped into the chair, put his elbows on the table, and buried his face in his hands. She came a little nearer, and laid her hand lightly on his arm. He made a movement as if to take it, but she withdrew it impatiently. "Come," she said brusquely; "now you're in for it you must play the game out.
Page 685 - Italian sovereignty, the like of which had not been seen since the days of the Caesars. Here was what the ill-starred Ciano had called "the chance of five thousand years.
Page 761 - ... should stand close to another. There had to be intervals in the rows, and considerable ones. Such intervals were necessary for communication, for an open road, for necessary travel. He determined to look for such a passage, and with that object approached still nearer to the wagons. The gleam of fires burning here and there might betray him, but on the other hand they were useful, for without them he could see neither the wagons nor the road between them. After a quarter of an hour he found a...
Page 762 - ... every moment nearer and salvation every moment nearer. Here are the oaks. Night beneath them is as black as under the ground; but that is better. A gentle breeze sprang up; the oaks murmured lightly, — you would have said they were muttering a prayer: "O great God, good God, guard this knight, for he is thy servant, and a faithful son of the land on which we have grown up for thy glory!
Page 758 - ... balls, full of death and the odor of corpses, appeared at that moment to Pan Longin a calm, peaceful, safe haven. His friends there would not think ill of him if he returned. He would tell them that the deed passed human power; and they would not go themselves, would not send another, — would wait further for the mercy of God and the coming of the king. But if Skshetuski should go and perish ! " In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost ! These are temptations of Satan,
Page 757 - ... some tens of steps farther on were those earth shelters, like stacks of hay in the darkness. But they were empty. Everywhere the deepest silence reigned, — nowhere a fire or a man; no one on that former square but the prostrate. Pan Longin began the prayer for the souls of the dead, and went on. The sounds of the Polish camp, which followed him to the second rampart, grew fainter and fainter, melting in the distance, till at last they ceased altogether. Pan Longin stopped and looked around...
Page 755 - That is better," answered Pan Longin. " Be quiet ! " interrupted Volodyovski : " I hear something. " "That is only the groan of a dying man, — nothing!" "If you can only reach the oak grove." " O my God ! my God ! " sighed Zagloba, trembling as if in a fever. " In three hours it will be daylight. " "It is time!" said Pan Longin. " Time ! time ! " repeated Skshetuski in a stifled voice.
Page 758 - Cossack patrols!" thought he. The voices of men reached his ears. He sprang aside with all speed, and searching with his foot for the first depression in the ground, fell to the earth and stretched out motionless, holding his pistol in one hand and his sword in the other. The riders approached still nearer, and at last were abreast of him. It was so dark he could not count them; but he heard every word of their conversation. "It is hard for them, but hard for us too,
Page 221 - The capture of the city would be followed by the taking of the forts at the harbor entrance, and then there would be nothing left for him to do but to surrender.
Page 752 - Your Highness," said Zagloba, "they want to go, but I do not. God is my witness that I have not come here to praise myself or to make mention of my services; and if I do mention them, I do so lest some one might suppose that I am afraid. Pan Skshetuski, Volodyovski, and Podbipienta of Myshekishki, are great knights; but Burlai, who fell by my hand (not to speak of other exploits), was also a famous warrior, equal to Burdabut...

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