With Malice Toward Some: How People Make Civil Liberties Judgments

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 1995 - Political Science - 288 pages
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How do citizens faced with a complex variety of considerations decide whether or not to tolerate extremist groups? Relying on several survey-experiments, the authors identify and compare the impact on decision making of contemporary information, long-standing predispositions, and enduring values and beliefs. People react most strongly to data about a group's violations of behavioral norms and the implications for democracy of the group's actions. The authors conclude that democratic citizens should have a strong baseline of tolerance yet be attentive to and thoughtful about current information.
 

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Contents

IV
3
V
15
VI
39
VII
53
VIII
55
IX
84
X
99
XI
101
XIV
160
XV
179
XVI
181
XVII
209
XVIII
229
XIX
245
XX
257
XXI
269

XII
114
XIII
133

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About the author (1995)

George E. Marcus is a professor of political science at Williams College.
W. Russell Neuman is a professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and director of the Information and Society Program, Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.
Michael MacKuen is the Burton Craige professor of political science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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