With the border ruffians: memories of the far West, 1852-1868

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John Murray, 1907 - Frontier and pioneer life - 478 pages
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Page 393 - The Commanding General considers that no greater disgrace could befall the army, and through it, our whole people, than the perpetration of the barbarous outrages upon the innocent and defenceless, and the wanton destruction of private property, that have marked the course of the enemy in our own country. Such proceedings not only disgrace the perpetrators and all connected with them, but are subversive of the discipline and efficiency of the army and destructive of the ends of our present movements....
Page 231 - ... Fredericksburg looking for men evading the draft. Two parties of twenty-five soldiers each took wagons to the outlying farms inhabited by families of men suspected of hiding in the hills and brought the women and children to town. "It was a pitiable sight to see all these poor folks stripped of their property, such as it was, earned by hard toil and exposure on a dangerous frontier," observed one sympathetic Rebel soldier.
Page 38 - Wolves and foxes were numerous too, and so daring that we had to hoist our kills high up on trees to keep them out of their reach. All the ridges were covered with the finest timber and were fairly clear of brush, but in the bottoms there was a dense growth of " ivy and laurel,
Page 197 - ... and arid Jornada del Muerto. It now was do or die with General Sibley and his column. Threatened on the east, opposed in the north, they had definitely left their base for a march into a country hostile by man and nature — a march of invasion which to be successful had to be completely successful. But our leaders were crazy, I think, in those days, and believed they had the game in their own hands; so no enterprise was too rash for them to undertake. I saw that gallant force march away, with...
Page 21 - Evidently it was a country where a man was valued for what he was, not for what he had , and the more I saw of it, the better I liked it.
Page 163 - It seemed rather a large order, but the " Boys " were in high spirits and eager for a fight. Before daybreak our small bugler had roused the camp, and by sun-up we had drunk our coffee and were off on our long ride. Our route lay, for the most part, by bridle-paths alongside the Medina River, which ran swift and clear between high cedar-clad ridges. We took all proper precautions, and had scouts well ahead, whilst every...
Page 32 - Besides clearing the land of logs, we put all the fencing into good repair, put up a pretty porch over the door, and windows and partitions in both the rooms, so that the house, when I sold it in the following summer, was, for that country, and those times, quite a nice place. Till the Bailys left in the fall we got on very well together, the old lady and the girls doing all they could to make me comfortable. They were always hard at work...
Page 30 - I settled to pay a very moderate weekly board for Jack and myself, until such time as the Bailys departed. Nearly all the arable fields were cumbered with deadened and dead trunks of great trees, and the first job we undertook was to log them up and burn them. This was about the heaviest work I have ever done, for the midsummer heat was terrific. Still we stuck to it...
Page 26 - Council soon shot a couple with his long flint-and-steel Kentucky rifle, and we returned as fast as we could, as the girls were waiting to cook them. In less than no time they were skinned, cut up, and stewed in cream gravy, and were delicious eating. After breakfast Baily, finding he could not screw me up to his terms, accepted mine. A piece of paper was found...

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