Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Dialectical Interpretation

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 175 pages
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"The philosopher strives to find the liberating word, that is, the word that finally permits us to grasp what up until now has intangibly weighed down our consciousness." Would Wittgenstein have been willing to describe the Tractatus as an attempt to find "the liberating word"? This is the basic contention of this strikingly innovative new study of the Tractatus. Matthew Ostrow argues that, far from seeking to offer a new theory in logic in the tradition of Frege and Russell, Wittgenstein from the very beginning viewed all such endeavors as the ensnarement of thought.
 

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Contents

Pictures and logical atomism
21
What is analysis?
46
The essence of the proposition
79
The liberating word
125
Notes
137
Bibliography
165
Index
171
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Page 3 - My propositions are elucidatory in this way: he who understands me finally recognizes them as senseless, when he has climbed out through them, on them, over them. (He must so to speak throw away the ladder, after he has climbed up on it.) He must surmount these propositions; then he sees the world rightly. Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent...

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