Woman of Valor: Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement in America

Front Cover
Anchor Books, 1992 - Social Science - 639 pages
Drawing on new information from archives and interviews, Chesler illuminates Margaret Sanger's turbulent personal story as well as the history of the birth control movement. An intimate biography of a visionary rebel, this is also an epic story that is indispensable reading for generations of women who take their reproductive and sexual freedoms for granted.

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WOMAN OF VALOR: Margaret Sanger and the Birth Control Movement in America

User Review  - Kirkus

A splendid biography of the woman who fought for more than half a century to bring birth control to America. Planned Parenthood clinics are once again in the thick of political turmoil over a woman's ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Angelic55blonde - LibraryThing

This was a great biography of an amazing woman whose life saw and shaped the evolution of the birth control movement. The book was well researched, and the addition of so many pictures brought the ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
11
THE WOMAN REBEL
19
Ghosts
21
Love and Work
44
Seeds of Rebellion
56
The Personal Is Political
74
Bohemia and Beyond
89
A European Education
105
Organizing for Birth Control
223
Happiness in Marriage
243
Doctors and Birth Control
269
A Community of Women
287
GRANDE DAME GRANDMERE
311
Lobbying for Birth Control
313
Same Old Deal
336
Foreign Diplomacy
355

The Frenzy of Renown
128
The Company She Kept
150
THE LADY REFORMER
177
New Woman New World
179
The Conditions of Reform
200
From Birth Control to Family Planning
371
Intermezzo
396
Last Act
414
Woman of the Century
443
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

ELLEN CHESLER is distinguished lecturer and director of the Eleanor Roosevelt Initiative on Women and Public Life at Roosevelt House, the new public policy center of Hunter College of the City University of New York. Woman of Valor was a finalist for PEN's 1993 Martha Albrand prize for the year's best first work of nonfiction.

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