Woman: Or, Ida of Athens

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1809 - 290 pages
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Page 23 - Jj serpents in the air, striking their cymbals, and uttering clithyrambics, appeared to surround him on every side.' p. 5. ' That modesty which is of soul, seemed to diffuse itself over a form, whose exquisite symmetry was at once betrayed and concealed by the apparent tissue of woven air, which fell like a vapour round her.' p. 23. ' Like Aurora, the extremities of her delicate limbs were rosed •with flowing hues, and her little foot, as it pressed its naked beauty on a scarlet cushion, resembled...
Page v - Sketches in one ; and Woman, though I had long revolved its plan and tendency in my mind, and frequently mentioned it in society, was not begun until the aoth of last July. It was written at intervals, in England, Wales, and Ireland, and almost always in the midst of what is called the world. It was finished on the 1 8th of October, and is now printed from the first copy.
Page xi - But, that nice power of developement which would justify the intentions of nature in their favour, is denied them by the oppression of the government under which they live, and the ignorance of those with whom they associate. And many a fair Leontium, and many a charming Aspasia, may still exist in Athens, unconscious -of the latent powers of their own ardent minds...
Page x - She defined these attributes as "that almost innate propensity to physical and moral beauty, that instinctive taste for the fair ideal, and that lively and delicate susceptibility to ardent and tender impressions, which should distinguish the character of woman in its purest and highest state of excellence.
Page 53 - Atalanta from its height,' &c. &c. p. 53. After repeated attempts to comprehend the meaning of these, and a hundred similar conundrums, in the compass of half as many pages, we gave them up in despair ; and were carelessly turning the leaves of the volume backward and forward, when the following passage, in a short note
Page x - ... so gracious to the mind. But, that nice power of developement which would justify the intentions of nature in their favour, is denied them by the oppression of the government under which they live, and the ignorance of those with whom they associate. And many a fair...
Page xxiv - They, indeed, found no difficulty in inspiriting the Greeks in defence of their naŤ tural rights, and for the recovery of their ancient liberties. The same love of freedom, the same vivacity of feeling, and ardour of enthusiasm, was found among many of the oppressed descendants of the heroes of Marathon and Platea as distinguished their immortal ancestors ; and, when their eager eyes beheld the liussian fleet doubling cape Matapan, the Archipelago thought itself free.
Page xxiv - Matapan, theArchipelagothought itself free. A beam of their ancient glory seemed to shine on the brow, -and warm the heart of the greek patriot; but the beam, though bright, was illusory ; and, like the faint, dissolving lustre of an autumnal iris, it died away in clouds and storms. Deserted by their allies, subdued by their tyrants, the patriots of Greece were only rescued from national slavery by the victorious sabres of those who imposed it. Thousands were massacred; and it was a point /in debate...
Page xiv - To that country in which the light of political prosperity shines with a pure and cloudless lustre, the heart of the philanthropist will impulsively turn with beneficent satisfaction ; but the nation which mourns over its sufferings, without the power to redress its wrongs, which faintly struggles in an interval of hope against that oppression which would impose a permanent despair, must eventually give rise to a romance of incident, to a boldness of character, and a vicissitude of event, which bestows...
Page vi - It is a fact that can be attested by my publishers that I never corrected a proof sheet of any one of my works, nor ever resided in England during their printing or publication.

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