Woman: Or, Ida of Athens, Volumes 1-2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1809 - 290 pages
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Page 65 - ... views, on which their virtues, rather than their prudence speculated. By this act, Osmyn had left himself almost destitute ; but little remained of a sum found in the casket of the caloyer monk ; but that little was sufficient for one whose wants were as moderate as his spirit was insatiable. By this act, he had also fixed himself so deeply in the confidence of the young conspirators, that uniting their sense of his disinterested liberality to their consciousness of his superiority in the use...
Page 191 - We hope to deliver, from the hands of the cruel Mahomedans, our empire, which they have usurped ; our patriarchate, and our holy religion, which they have profaned ; to rescue' the descendants of Athens, and of Lacedemon, from the tyrannic yoke of ignorant barbarians, under which a nation, whose genius is not extinguished, still groans — a people, glowing with the love of liberty, whom the iron chains of barbarism have not degraded — who have .constantly before their eyes the images of their...
Page 95 - ... that season, which evinces the omnipotence of a prejudice over -those minds to whom truth and nature are strangers; when the dogma of a puerile superstition holds in subjection the influence of climate, of habit, and of inclination ; when nature herself stands checked ! when the passions, the wants incidental to the state of man, are shackled and restrained, and when all imposes a universal abstinence, which all observe from every natural pleasure, or -rational enjoyment. Such is the influence...
Page 95 - ... nature herself stands checked ! when the passions, the wants incidental to the state of man, are shackled and restrained, and when all imposes a universal abstinence, which all observe from every natural pleasure, or rational enjoyment. Such is the. influence of a bigoted faith on a people, who, with the exception of their term of annual fast, are, of all nations, the most devoted to the mere pleasures of sense...
Page 159 - She trembled again to hazard her peace by surrendering her very existence into the possession of another. She felt she was not calculated for the indulgence of a moderate sentiment ; and she blushed to acknowledge, even to herself, the full capability of tenderness, which lay secretly stored within her heart. It was thus that the englishman found her involved in all the bashful diffidence of a simple and inexperienced recluse — trembling for herself — fearing for others — systematically suppressing...

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