Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 27, 2003 - Philosophy
In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between early modern women's thought and the anti-dualism of more recent feminist thinkers. The result is a more gender-balanced account of early modern thought than has hitherto been available. Broad's clear and accessible exploration of this still-unfamiliar area will have a strong appeal to both students and scholars in the history of philosophy, women's studies and the history of ideas.
 

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Contents

1 Elisabeth of Bohemia
13
2 Margaret Cavendish
35
3 Anne Conway
65
4 Mary Astell
90
5 Damaris Masham
114
6 Catharine Trotter Cockburn
141
Conclusion
166
Bibliography
168
Index
184
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About the author (2003)

Jacqueline Broad is a Doctor of Philosophy in the School of Philosophy and Bioethics at Monash University, Melbourne. She has published on women's philosophy in the Dictionary of Literary Biography volume on British Philosophers, and the Australasian Journal of Philosophy.

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