Women Teaching for Change: Gender, Class & Power

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1988 - Education - 174 pages
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Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise. Maxine Green, Columbia University

Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms.

 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE Critical Educational Theory
1
CHAPTER TWO Feminist Analyses of Gender and Schooling
27
CHAPTER THREE Feminist Methodology
57
CHAPTER FOUR The Dialectics of Gender in the Lives of Feminist Teachers
73
CHAPTER FIVE The Struggle for a Critical Literacy
101
CHAPTER SIX Gender Race and Class in the Feminist Classroom
125
CHAPTER SEVEN Conclusion
147
Bibliography
155
Index
165
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About the author (1988)

Henry A. Giroux is the well-known author of numerous books and articles on society, education, and political culture. He is Waterbury Chair of Education at Pennsylvania State University and lives in State College, Pennsylvania.

Paulo Freire is one of the most widely read educational philosophers and practitioners in the world today, except in the United States, where he remains relatively unknown to many in the educational community as well as the general public. Freire received international acclaim and notoriety with his first and best-known work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, first published in English in 1970. His teachings draw much of their inspiration from a Marxist critique of society; for this reason he was forced into exile from his native Brazil in 1964, and his works were banned in many developing nations. His pedagogy for adult literacy has been implemented successfully in several African nations and has been the basis for literacy crusades in Nicaragua and other Latin American countries. His philosophical approach to education forms the basis for much of the critical theory work in education now taking place in the United States, Europe, and developing nations.

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